‘God’s plan’: Family flees amid catastrophic Nigeria floods


              Musa Saleh, a 50-year-old Islamic teacher, points at the level the water reached in the early days of floods at Tabawa Primary School northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. The flooding that began in June has become the deadliest in more than a decade, according to authorities of this West African nation. More than 600 have been killed. Thousands of homes are destroyed, along with farmland. More than 1.3 million people have been displaced. Lives and livelihoods are upended. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Musa Saleh, a 50-year-old Islamic teacher, points at the level the water reached in the early days of floods at Tabawa Primary School northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. The flooding that began in June has become the deadliest in more than a decade, according to authorities of this West African nation. More than 600 have been killed. Thousands of homes are destroyed, along with farmland. More than 1.3 million people have been displaced. Lives and livelihoods are upended. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Musa Saleh, a 50-year-old Islamic teacher, points at the level the water reached in the early days of floods at Tabawa Primary School northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. The flooding that began in June has become the deadliest in more than a decade, according to authorities of this West African nation. More than 600 have been killed. Thousands of homes are destroyed, along with farmland. More than 1.3 million people have been displaced. Lives and livelihoods are upended. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Musa Saleh, a 50-year-old Islamic teacher, points at the level the water reached in the early days of floods at Tabawa Primary School northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. The flooding that began in June has become the deadliest in more than a decade, according to authorities of this West African nation. More than 600 have been killed. Thousands of homes are destroyed, along with farmland. More than 1.3 million people have been displaced. Lives and livelihoods are upended. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Musa Saleh, a 50-year-old Islamic teacher, points at the level the water reached in the early days of floods at Tabawa Primary School northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. The flooding that began in June has become the deadliest in more than a decade, according to authorities of this West African nation. More than 600 have been killed. Thousands of homes are destroyed, along with farmland. More than 1.3 million people have been displaced. Lives and livelihoods are upended. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Musa Saleh, a 50-year-old Islamic teacher, points at the level the water reached in the early days of floods at Tabawa Primary School northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. The flooding that began in June has become the deadliest in more than a decade, according to authorities of this West African nation. More than 600 have been killed. Thousands of homes are destroyed, along with farmland. More than 1.3 million people have been displaced. Lives and livelihoods are upended. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Musa Saleh, a 50-year-old Islamic teacher, points at the level the water reached in the early days of floods at Tabawa Primary School northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. The flooding that began in June has become the deadliest in more than a decade, according to authorities of this West African nation. More than 600 have been killed. Thousands of homes are destroyed, along with farmland. More than 1.3 million people have been displaced. Lives and livelihoods are upended. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Musa Saleh, a 50-year-old Islamic teacher, points at the level the water reached in the early days of floods at Tabawa Primary School northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. The flooding that began in June has become the deadliest in more than a decade, according to authorities of this West African nation. More than 600 have been killed. Thousands of homes are destroyed, along with farmland. More than 1.3 million people have been displaced. Lives and livelihoods are upended. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Musa Saleh, a 50-year-old Islamic teacher, points at the level the water reached in the early days of floods at Tabawa Primary School northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. The flooding that began in June has become the deadliest in more than a decade, according to authorities of this West African nation. More than 600 have been killed. Thousands of homes are destroyed, along with farmland. More than 1.3 million people have been displaced. Lives and livelihoods are upended. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Musa Saleh, a 50-year-old Islamic teacher, points at the level the water reached in the early days of floods at Tabawa Primary School northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. The flooding that began in June has become the deadliest in more than a decade, according to authorities of this West African nation. More than 600 have been killed. Thousands of homes are destroyed, along with farmland. More than 1.3 million people have been displaced. Lives and livelihoods are upended. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Musa Saleh, a 50-year-old Islamic teacher, points at the level the water reached in the early days of floods at Tabawa Primary School northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. The flooding that began in June has become the deadliest in more than a decade, according to authorities of this West African nation. More than 600 have been killed. Thousands of homes are destroyed, along with farmland. More than 1.3 million people have been displaced. Lives and livelihoods are upended. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Musa Saleh, a 50-year-old Islamic teacher, points at the level the water reached in the early days of floods at Tabawa Primary School northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. The flooding that began in June has become the deadliest in more than a decade, according to authorities of this West African nation. More than 600 have been killed. Thousands of homes are destroyed, along with farmland. More than 1.3 million people have been displaced. Lives and livelihoods are upended. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Musa Saleh, a 50-year-old Islamic teacher, points at the level the water reached in the early days of floods at Tabawa Primary School northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. The flooding that began in June has become the deadliest in more than a decade, according to authorities of this West African nation. More than 600 have been killed. Thousands of homes are destroyed, along with farmland. More than 1.3 million people have been displaced. Lives and livelihoods are upended. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Musa Saleh, a 50-year-old Islamic teacher, points at the level the water reached in the early days of floods at Tabawa Primary School northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. The flooding that began in June has become the deadliest in more than a decade, according to authorities of this West African nation. More than 600 have been killed. Thousands of homes are destroyed, along with farmland. More than 1.3 million people have been displaced. Lives and livelihoods are upended. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Musa Saleh, a 50-year-old Islamic teacher, points at the level the water reached in the early days of floods at Tabawa Primary School northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. The flooding that began in June has become the deadliest in more than a decade, according to authorities of this West African nation. More than 600 have been killed. Thousands of homes are destroyed, along with farmland. More than 1.3 million people have been displaced. Lives and livelihoods are upended. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Musa Saleh, a 50-year-old Islamic teacher, points at the level the water reached in the early days of floods at Tabawa Primary School northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. The flooding that began in June has become the deadliest in more than a decade, according to authorities of this West African nation. More than 600 have been killed. Thousands of homes are destroyed, along with farmland. More than 1.3 million people have been displaced. Lives and livelihoods are upended. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Musa Saleh, a 50-year-old Islamic teacher, points at the level the water reached in the early days of floods at Tabawa Primary School northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. The flooding that began in June has become the deadliest in more than a decade, according to authorities of this West African nation. More than 600 have been killed. Thousands of homes are destroyed, along with farmland. More than 1.3 million people have been displaced. Lives and livelihoods are upended. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Musa Saleh, a 50-year-old Islamic teacher, points at the level the water reached in the early days of floods at Tabawa Primary School northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. The flooding that began in June has become the deadliest in more than a decade, according to authorities of this West African nation. More than 600 have been killed. Thousands of homes are destroyed, along with farmland. More than 1.3 million people have been displaced. Lives and livelihoods are upended. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Musa Saleh, a 50-year-old Islamic teacher, points at the level the water reached in the early days of floods at Tabawa Primary School northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. The flooding that began in June has become the deadliest in more than a decade, according to authorities of this West African nation. More than 600 have been killed. Thousands of homes are destroyed, along with farmland. More than 1.3 million people have been displaced. Lives and livelihoods are upended. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Musa Saleh, a 50-year-old Islamic teacher, points at the level the water reached in the early days of floods at Tabawa Primary School northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. The flooding that began in June has become the deadliest in more than a decade, according to authorities of this West African nation. More than 600 have been killed. Thousands of homes are destroyed, along with farmland. More than 1.3 million people have been displaced. Lives and livelihoods are upended. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Musa Saleh, a 50-year-old Islamic teacher, points at the level the water reached in the early days of floods at Tabawa Primary School northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. The flooding that began in June has become the deadliest in more than a decade, according to authorities of this West African nation. More than 600 have been killed. Thousands of homes are destroyed, along with farmland. More than 1.3 million people have been displaced. Lives and livelihoods are upended. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Musa Saleh, a 50-year-old Islamic teacher, points at the level the water reached in the early days of floods at Tabawa Primary School northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. The flooding that began in June has become the deadliest in more than a decade, according to authorities of this West African nation. More than 600 have been killed. Thousands of homes are destroyed, along with farmland. More than 1.3 million people have been displaced. Lives and livelihoods are upended. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Musa Saleh, a 50-year-old Islamic teacher, points at the level the water reached in the early days of floods at Tabawa Primary School northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. The flooding that began in June has become the deadliest in more than a decade, according to authorities of this West African nation. More than 600 have been killed. Thousands of homes are destroyed, along with farmland. More than 1.3 million people have been displaced. Lives and livelihoods are upended. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Musa Saleh, a 50-year-old Islamic teacher, points at the level the water reached in the early days of floods at Tabawa Primary School northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. The flooding that began in June has become the deadliest in more than a decade, according to authorities of this West African nation. More than 600 have been killed. Thousands of homes are destroyed, along with farmland. More than 1.3 million people have been displaced. Lives and livelihoods are upended. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Musa Saleh, a 50-year-old Islamic teacher, points at the level the water reached in the early days of floods at Tabawa Primary School northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. The flooding that began in June has become the deadliest in more than a decade, according to authorities of this West African nation. More than 600 have been killed. Thousands of homes are destroyed, along with farmland. More than 1.3 million people have been displaced. Lives and livelihoods are upended. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Husseina Ali, 9, daughter of Aisha Ali, stands inside the hut where she found refuge from the floods in Darayami, northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. When floodwaters reached her hut made of woven straw mats and raffia palms, Aisha packed up what belongings she could and set off on foot with her eight youngest children. "While the flood was trying to destroy things, we were trying to save ourselves," she said. Four of her children perished. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba))
            
              Aisha Ali, 40, right, is joined by other woman mourning her four dead children in Darayami, northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. When floodwaters reached her hut made of woven straw mats and raffia palms, Aisha packed up what belongings she could and set off on foot with her eight youngest children. "While the flood was trying to destroy things, we were trying to save ourselves," she said. Only four of her children survived.(AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              A man rides a two-wheeled push cart in Tabawa, northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. The flooding that began in June has become the deadliest in more than a decade, according to authorities of this West African nation. More than 600 have been killed. Thousands of homes are destroyed, along with farmland. More than 1.3 million people have been displaced.(AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Musa Grema, 40, walk past the grave were Aisha Ali's children are buried in Tabawa, northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. "While the flood was trying to destroy things, we were trying to save ourselves," said Aisha. Four of her children perished. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Musa Saleh, a 50-year-old islamic teacher, points at the level the water reached in the early days of floods at Tabawa Primary School northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. The flooding that began in June has become the deadliest in more than a decade, according to authorities of this West African nation. More than 600 have been killed. Thousands of homes are destroyed, along with farmland. More than 1.3 million people have been displaced. Lives and livelihoods are upended. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Aisha Ali's husband Mallam Baida Ali, right, prays in Darayami, northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. When floodwaters reached their hut made of woven straw mats and raffia palms, they packed up what belongings they could and set off on foot with their eight youngest children. "While the flood was trying to destroy things, we were trying to save ourselves," said Aisha. Four of her children perished. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Husseina Ali, 9, daughter of Aisha Ali, cries inside hut where she found refuge from the floods in Darayami, northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. When floodwaters reached her hut made of woven straw mats and raffia palms, Aisha packed up what belongings she could and set off on foot with her eight youngest children. "While the flood was trying to destroy things, we were trying to save ourselves," she said. Four of her children perished. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Husseina Ali, 9, daughter of Aisha Ali, carries food outside the hut where she found refuge from the floods in Darayami, northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. When floodwaters reached her hut made of woven straw mats and raffia palms, Aisha packed up what belongings she could and set off on foot with her eight youngest children. "While the flood was trying to destroy things, we were trying to save ourselves," she said. Four of her children perished. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Aisha Ali, 40, sits with her children inside the hut where she found refuge from the floods in Darayami, northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. When floodwaters reached her hut made of woven straw mats and raffia palms, she packed up what belongings she could and set off on foot with her eight youngest children. "While the flood was trying to destroy things, we were trying to save ourselves," she said. Four of her children perished. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Aisha Ali, 40, sits with her children inside the hut where she found refuge from the floods in Darayami, northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. When floodwaters reached her hut made of woven straw mats and raffia palms, she packed up what belongings she could and set off on foot with her eight youngest children. "While the flood was trying to destroy things, we were trying to save ourselves," she said. Four of her children perished. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Aisha Ali, 40, sits with her children outside the hut where she found refuge from the floods in Darayami, northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. When floodwaters reached her hut made of woven straw mats and raffia palms, she packed up what belongings she could and set off on foot with her eight youngest children. "While the flood was trying to destroy things, we were trying to save ourselves," she said. Four of her children perished. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Aisha Ali, 40, stands with her children outside the hut where she found refuge from the floods in Darayami, northeastern Nigeria, Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. When floodwaters reached her hut made of woven straw mats and raffia palms, she packed up what belongings she could and set off on foot with her eight youngest children. "While the flood was trying to destroy things, we were trying to save ourselves," she said. Four of her children perished. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
            
              Aisha Ali, 40, cries as she and her daughter Husseina, 9, wait in Tabawa, northeastern Nigeria, for four her or children to be prepared for burial Wednesday Oct. 26, 2022. When floodwaters reached her hut made of woven straw mats and raffia palms, she packed up what belongings she could and set off on foot with her eight youngest children. "While the flood was trying to destroy things, we were trying to save ourselves," she said.(AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)
‘God’s plan’: Family flees amid catastrophic Nigeria floods