How Russian soldiers ran a ‘cleansing’ operation in Bucha


              FILE - A family walks amid destroyed Russian tanks in Bucha, on the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Wednesday, April 6, 2022. Ukrainian prosecutors now say those responsible for the violence at 144 Yablunska were soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
            
              FILE - Nadiya Trubchaninova, 70, cries while holding the coffin of her son Vadym, 48, who was killed by Russian soldiers last March 30 in Bucha, during his funeral in the cemetery of Mykulychi, on the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Saturday, April 16, 2022. Trubchaninova hitchhiked daily from her village to the shattered town of Bucha trying to bring her son's body home for burial. As their advance to Kyiv stalled and losses mounted, Russian troops continued to cleanse the streets of Bucha and surrounding towns with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)
            
              FILE - Volunteers load bodies of civilians killed in Bucha onto a truck to be taken to a morgue for investigation, in the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 12, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. When Russian soldiers unable to reach Kyiv faced mounting losses, they became more erratic, conducting sweeps with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)
            
              Natalia Vlasenko buried her husband, Pavlo Vlasenko, in her yard under part of a fence, seen in this Monday, April 4, 2022, photo, in Bucha, Ukraine. Russian soldiers beat Pavlo Vlasenko to death and then set his body on fire. Days after Vlasenko buried her husband, she discovered the body of her grandson, Dmytro Chaplyhin, who was known as Dima, at a Russian headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Dima was one of at least nine men Russian soldiers picked up during a Mar. 4 sweep and later executed. (AP Photo/Vadim Girda)
            
              A neighbor comforts Natalia Vlasenko, whose husband, Pavlo Vlasenko, and grandson, Dmytro Chaplyhin, called Dima, were killed by Russian forces, as she cries in her garden in Bucha, Ukraine, Monday, April 4, 2022. Russian soldiers picked up Dima during a Mar. 4 sweep, accused him of being a spotter helping the Ukrainian military and brought him to their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Ukrainian prosecutors now say those responsible for the violence at 144 Yablunska were soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the ultimate battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
            
              The body of Dmytro Chaplyhin, called Dima, lies on the ground after it was identified by a neighbor after he was killed on the grounds of 144 Yablunska Street, an industrial complex Russian troops used as a headquarters in Bucha, Ukraine, Monday, April 4, 2022. Russian soldiers found images of Russian tanks on Dima's phone and accused him of being a spotter helping the Ukrainian military. Ukrainian prosecutors now say those responsible for the violence at 144 Yablunska were soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the ultimate battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
            
              In this undated photo provided by his family, Dmytro Chaplyhin, right, 20, poses with a friend. Russian soldiers found images of Russian tanks on Chaplyhin’s phone during a March 4, 2022, sweep of Bucha, Ukraine. They accused him of being a spotter and killed him at their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. (Vlasenko family via AP)
            
              In this undated photo provided by his family is a selfie taken by Dmytro Chaplyhin, 20, a store clerk who everyone called Dima. Dima was one of at least nine men Russian soldiers picked up during a March 4, 2022 sweep of Bucha, Ukraine, and executed at their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Ukrainian prosecutors now say they know who is responsible: soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the ultimate battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (Vlasenko family via AP)
            
              FILE - Ira Gavriluk holds her cat as she walks next to the bodies of her husband, brother, and another man, who were killed outside her home in Bucha, Ukraine, Monday, April 4, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns outside Kyiv “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. When troops unable to reach Kyiv faced mounting losses, they became more erratic, conducting their sweeps with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
            
              FILE - Municipal workers remove the body of a man who died from a house in Bucha, Ukraine, Thursday, April 7, 2022. Russians hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify potential threats. Those who didn’t pass this filtration, including volunteer fighters and civilians suspected of assisting Ukrainian troops, were tortured and executed, surveillance video, audio intercepts and interviews show. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              FILE - A dog stands next to the body of an elderly woman killed inside a house in Bucha, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 5, 2022. Russians hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify potential threats. As their advance to Kyiv stalled and losses mounted, Russian troops continued to cleanse the streets of Bucha and surrounding towns with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
            
              The basement of an office building at 144 Yablunska where civilians were held, in Bucha, Ukraine, shown on April 29, 2022. The only toilet was broken. Children cried. Adults prayed. The smell of human waste was overpowering. (AP Photo/Erika Kinetz)
            
              FILE - The lifeless body of a man lies on the ground, in Bucha, Ukraine, Sunday, April 3, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns outside Kyiv “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. When troops unable to reach Kyiv faced mounting losses, they became more erratic, conducting their sweeps with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              FILE - Policemen work to identify civilians who were killed during the Russian occupation in Bucha, Ukraine, on the outskirts of Kyiv, before sending the bodies to the morgue, Wednesday, April 6, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)
            
              In this image from March 4, 2022, surveillance video provided by the Ukrainian government, Russian troops lead nine men at gunpoint to their headquarters on Yablunska Street in Bucha, where they would be tortured and executed. The men were picked up as part of what Russian soldiers called “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. (Ukrainian government via AP)
            
              FILE - A lifeless body of a man with his hands tied behind his back lies on the ground in Bucha, Ukraine, Sunday, April 3, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns outside Kyiv “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              EDS NOTE: GRAPHIC CONTENT - FILE - Lifeless bodies of men, some with their hands tied behind their backs, lie on the ground in Bucha, Ukraine, Sunday, April 3, 2022. Russian soldiers picked up these men on March 4, 2022, as they swept the streets of Bucha to identify and neutralize potential threats. Ukrainian prosecutors now say they know who was responsible for the violence that day: Soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, who ultimately reported up to Col. Gen. Alexander Chaiko, a man known for his brutality as leader of Russia’s troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              FILE - A family walks amid destroyed Russian tanks in Bucha, on the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Wednesday, April 6, 2022. Ukrainian prosecutors now say those responsible for the violence at 144 Yablunska were soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
            
              FILE - Nadiya Trubchaninova, 70, cries while holding the coffin of her son Vadym, 48, who was killed by Russian soldiers last March 30 in Bucha, during his funeral in the cemetery of Mykulychi, on the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Saturday, April 16, 2022. Trubchaninova hitchhiked daily from her village to the shattered town of Bucha trying to bring her son's body home for burial. As their advance to Kyiv stalled and losses mounted, Russian troops continued to cleanse the streets of Bucha and surrounding towns with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)
            
              FILE - Volunteers load bodies of civilians killed in Bucha onto a truck to be taken to a morgue for investigation, in the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 12, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. When Russian soldiers unable to reach Kyiv faced mounting losses, they became more erratic, conducting sweeps with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)
            
              Natalia Vlasenko buried her husband, Pavlo Vlasenko, in her yard under part of a fence, seen in this Monday, April 4, 2022, photo, in Bucha, Ukraine. Russian soldiers beat Pavlo Vlasenko to death and then set his body on fire. Days after Vlasenko buried her husband, she discovered the body of her grandson, Dmytro Chaplyhin, who was known as Dima, at a Russian headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Dima was one of at least nine men Russian soldiers picked up during a Mar. 4 sweep and later executed. (AP Photo/Vadim Girda)
            
              A neighbor comforts Natalia Vlasenko, whose husband, Pavlo Vlasenko, and grandson, Dmytro Chaplyhin, called Dima, were killed by Russian forces, as she cries in her garden in Bucha, Ukraine, Monday, April 4, 2022. Russian soldiers picked up Dima during a Mar. 4 sweep, accused him of being a spotter helping the Ukrainian military and brought him to their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Ukrainian prosecutors now say those responsible for the violence at 144 Yablunska were soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the ultimate battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
            
              The body of Dmytro Chaplyhin, called Dima, lies on the ground after it was identified by a neighbor after he was killed on the grounds of 144 Yablunska Street, an industrial complex Russian troops used as a headquarters in Bucha, Ukraine, Monday, April 4, 2022. Russian soldiers found images of Russian tanks on Dima's phone and accused him of being a spotter helping the Ukrainian military. Ukrainian prosecutors now say those responsible for the violence at 144 Yablunska were soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the ultimate battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
            
              In this undated photo provided by his family, Dmytro Chaplyhin, right, 20, poses with a friend. Russian soldiers found images of Russian tanks on Chaplyhin’s phone during a March 4, 2022, sweep of Bucha, Ukraine. They accused him of being a spotter and killed him at their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. (Vlasenko family via AP)
            
              In this undated photo provided by his family is a selfie taken by Dmytro Chaplyhin, 20, a store clerk who everyone called Dima. Dima was one of at least nine men Russian soldiers picked up during a March 4, 2022 sweep of Bucha, Ukraine, and executed at their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Ukrainian prosecutors now say they know who is responsible: soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the ultimate battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (Vlasenko family via AP)
            
              FILE - Ira Gavriluk holds her cat as she walks next to the bodies of her husband, brother, and another man, who were killed outside her home in Bucha, Ukraine, Monday, April 4, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns outside Kyiv “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. When troops unable to reach Kyiv faced mounting losses, they became more erratic, conducting their sweeps with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
            
              FILE - Municipal workers remove the body of a man who died from a house in Bucha, Ukraine, Thursday, April 7, 2022. Russians hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify potential threats. Those who didn’t pass this filtration, including volunteer fighters and civilians suspected of assisting Ukrainian troops, were tortured and executed, surveillance video, audio intercepts and interviews show. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              FILE - A dog stands next to the body of an elderly woman killed inside a house in Bucha, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 5, 2022. Russians hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify potential threats. As their advance to Kyiv stalled and losses mounted, Russian troops continued to cleanse the streets of Bucha and surrounding towns with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
            
              The basement of an office building at 144 Yablunska where civilians were held, in Bucha, Ukraine, shown on April 29, 2022. The only toilet was broken. Children cried. Adults prayed. The smell of human waste was overpowering. (AP Photo/Erika Kinetz)
            
              FILE - The lifeless body of a man lies on the ground, in Bucha, Ukraine, Sunday, April 3, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns outside Kyiv “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. When troops unable to reach Kyiv faced mounting losses, they became more erratic, conducting their sweeps with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              FILE - Policemen work to identify civilians who were killed during the Russian occupation in Bucha, Ukraine, on the outskirts of Kyiv, before sending the bodies to the morgue, Wednesday, April 6, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)
            
              In this image from March 4, 2022, surveillance video provided by the Ukrainian government, Russian troops lead nine men at gunpoint to their headquarters on Yablunska Street in Bucha, where they would be tortured and executed. The men were picked up as part of what Russian soldiers called “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. (Ukrainian government via AP)
            
              FILE - A lifeless body of a man with his hands tied behind his back lies on the ground in Bucha, Ukraine, Sunday, April 3, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns outside Kyiv “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              EDS NOTE: GRAPHIC CONTENT - FILE - Lifeless bodies of men, some with their hands tied behind their backs, lie on the ground in Bucha, Ukraine, Sunday, April 3, 2022. Russian soldiers picked up these men on March 4, 2022, as they swept the streets of Bucha to identify and neutralize potential threats. Ukrainian prosecutors now say they know who was responsible for the violence that day: Soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, who ultimately reported up to Col. Gen. Alexander Chaiko, a man known for his brutality as leader of Russia’s troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              FILE - A family walks amid destroyed Russian tanks in Bucha, on the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Wednesday, April 6, 2022. Ukrainian prosecutors now say those responsible for the violence at 144 Yablunska were soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
            
              FILE - Nadiya Trubchaninova, 70, cries while holding the coffin of her son Vadym, 48, who was killed by Russian soldiers last March 30 in Bucha, during his funeral in the cemetery of Mykulychi, on the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Saturday, April 16, 2022. Trubchaninova hitchhiked daily from her village to the shattered town of Bucha trying to bring her son's body home for burial. As their advance to Kyiv stalled and losses mounted, Russian troops continued to cleanse the streets of Bucha and surrounding towns with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)
            
              FILE - A family walks amid destroyed Russian tanks in Bucha, on the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Wednesday, April 6, 2022. Ukrainian prosecutors now say those responsible for the violence at 144 Yablunska were soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
            
              FILE - Volunteers load bodies of civilians killed in Bucha onto a truck to be taken to a morgue for investigation, in the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 12, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. When Russian soldiers unable to reach Kyiv faced mounting losses, they became more erratic, conducting sweeps with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)
            
              FILE - Nadiya Trubchaninova, 70, cries while holding the coffin of her son Vadym, 48, who was killed by Russian soldiers last March 30 in Bucha, during his funeral in the cemetery of Mykulychi, on the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Saturday, April 16, 2022. Trubchaninova hitchhiked daily from her village to the shattered town of Bucha trying to bring her son's body home for burial. As their advance to Kyiv stalled and losses mounted, Russian troops continued to cleanse the streets of Bucha and surrounding towns with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)
            
              Natalia Vlasenko buried her husband, Pavlo Vlasenko, in her yard under part of a fence, seen in this Monday, April 4, 2022, photo, in Bucha, Ukraine. Russian soldiers beat Pavlo Vlasenko to death and then set his body on fire. Days after Vlasenko buried her husband, she discovered the body of her grandson, Dmytro Chaplyhin, who was known as Dima, at a Russian headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Dima was one of at least nine men Russian soldiers picked up during a Mar. 4 sweep and later executed. (AP Photo/Vadim Girda)
            
              FILE - Volunteers load bodies of civilians killed in Bucha onto a truck to be taken to a morgue for investigation, in the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 12, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. When Russian soldiers unable to reach Kyiv faced mounting losses, they became more erratic, conducting sweeps with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)
            
              A neighbor comforts Natalia Vlasenko, whose husband, Pavlo Vlasenko, and grandson, Dmytro Chaplyhin, called Dima, were killed by Russian forces, as she cries in her garden in Bucha, Ukraine, Monday, April 4, 2022. Russian soldiers picked up Dima during a Mar. 4 sweep, accused him of being a spotter helping the Ukrainian military and brought him to their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Ukrainian prosecutors now say those responsible for the violence at 144 Yablunska were soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the ultimate battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
            
              Natalia Vlasenko buried her husband, Pavlo Vlasenko, in her yard under part of a fence, seen in this Monday, April 4, 2022, photo, in Bucha, Ukraine. Russian soldiers beat Pavlo Vlasenko to death and then set his body on fire. Days after Vlasenko buried her husband, she discovered the body of her grandson, Dmytro Chaplyhin, who was known as Dima, at a Russian headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Dima was one of at least nine men Russian soldiers picked up during a Mar. 4 sweep and later executed. (AP Photo/Vadim Girda)
            
              The body of Dmytro Chaplyhin, called Dima, lies on the ground after it was identified by a neighbor after he was killed on the grounds of 144 Yablunska Street, an industrial complex Russian troops used as a headquarters in Bucha, Ukraine, Monday, April 4, 2022. Russian soldiers found images of Russian tanks on Dima's phone and accused him of being a spotter helping the Ukrainian military. Ukrainian prosecutors now say those responsible for the violence at 144 Yablunska were soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the ultimate battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
            
              A neighbor comforts Natalia Vlasenko, whose husband, Pavlo Vlasenko, and grandson, Dmytro Chaplyhin, called Dima, were killed by Russian forces, as she cries in her garden in Bucha, Ukraine, Monday, April 4, 2022. Russian soldiers picked up Dima during a Mar. 4 sweep, accused him of being a spotter helping the Ukrainian military and brought him to their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Ukrainian prosecutors now say those responsible for the violence at 144 Yablunska were soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the ultimate battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
            
              The body of Dmytro Chaplyhin, called Dima, lies on the ground after it was identified by a neighbor after he was killed on the grounds of 144 Yablunska Street, an industrial complex Russian troops used as a headquarters in Bucha, Ukraine, Monday, April 4, 2022. Russian soldiers found images of Russian tanks on Dima's phone and accused him of being a spotter helping the Ukrainian military. Ukrainian prosecutors now say those responsible for the violence at 144 Yablunska were soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the ultimate battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
            
              In this undated photo provided by his family, Dmytro Chaplyhin, right, 20, poses with a friend. Russian soldiers found images of Russian tanks on Chaplyhin’s phone during a March 4, 2022, sweep of Bucha, Ukraine. They accused him of being a spotter and killed him at their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. (Vlasenko family via AP)
            
              In this undated photo provided by his family, Dmytro Chaplyhin, right, 20, poses with a friend. Russian soldiers found images of Russian tanks on Chaplyhin’s phone during a March 4, 2022, sweep of Bucha, Ukraine. They accused him of being a spotter and killed him at their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. (Vlasenko family via AP)
            
              In this undated photo provided by his family is a selfie taken by Dmytro Chaplyhin, 20, a store clerk who everyone called Dima. Dima was one of at least nine men Russian soldiers picked up during a March 4, 2022 sweep of Bucha, Ukraine, and executed at their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Ukrainian prosecutors now say they know who is responsible: soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the ultimate battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (Vlasenko family via AP)
            
              In this undated photo provided by his family is a selfie taken by Dmytro Chaplyhin, 20, a store clerk who everyone called Dima. Dima was one of at least nine men Russian soldiers picked up during a March 4, 2022 sweep of Bucha, Ukraine, and executed at their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Ukrainian prosecutors now say they know who is responsible: soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the ultimate battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (Vlasenko family via AP)
            
              FILE - Ira Gavriluk holds her cat as she walks next to the bodies of her husband, brother, and another man, who were killed outside her home in Bucha, Ukraine, Monday, April 4, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns outside Kyiv “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. When troops unable to reach Kyiv faced mounting losses, they became more erratic, conducting their sweeps with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
            
              FILE - Ira Gavriluk holds her cat as she walks next to the bodies of her husband, brother, and another man, who were killed outside her home in Bucha, Ukraine, Monday, April 4, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns outside Kyiv “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. When troops unable to reach Kyiv faced mounting losses, they became more erratic, conducting their sweeps with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
            
              FILE - Municipal workers remove the body of a man who died from a house in Bucha, Ukraine, Thursday, April 7, 2022. Russians hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify potential threats. Those who didn’t pass this filtration, including volunteer fighters and civilians suspected of assisting Ukrainian troops, were tortured and executed, surveillance video, audio intercepts and interviews show. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              FILE - Municipal workers remove the body of a man who died from a house in Bucha, Ukraine, Thursday, April 7, 2022. Russians hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify potential threats. Those who didn’t pass this filtration, including volunteer fighters and civilians suspected of assisting Ukrainian troops, were tortured and executed, surveillance video, audio intercepts and interviews show. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              FILE - A dog stands next to the body of an elderly woman killed inside a house in Bucha, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 5, 2022. Russians hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify potential threats. As their advance to Kyiv stalled and losses mounted, Russian troops continued to cleanse the streets of Bucha and surrounding towns with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
            
              FILE - A dog stands next to the body of an elderly woman killed inside a house in Bucha, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 5, 2022. Russians hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify potential threats. As their advance to Kyiv stalled and losses mounted, Russian troops continued to cleanse the streets of Bucha and surrounding towns with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
            
              The basement of an office building at 144 Yablunska where civilians were held, in Bucha, Ukraine, shown on April 29, 2022. The only toilet was broken. Children cried. Adults prayed. The smell of human waste was overpowering. (AP Photo/Erika Kinetz)
            
              The basement of an office building at 144 Yablunska where civilians were held, in Bucha, Ukraine, shown on April 29, 2022. The only toilet was broken. Children cried. Adults prayed. The smell of human waste was overpowering. (AP Photo/Erika Kinetz)
            
              FILE - The lifeless body of a man lies on the ground, in Bucha, Ukraine, Sunday, April 3, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns outside Kyiv “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. When troops unable to reach Kyiv faced mounting losses, they became more erratic, conducting their sweeps with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              FILE - The lifeless body of a man lies on the ground, in Bucha, Ukraine, Sunday, April 3, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns outside Kyiv “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. When troops unable to reach Kyiv faced mounting losses, they became more erratic, conducting their sweeps with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              FILE - Policemen work to identify civilians who were killed during the Russian occupation in Bucha, Ukraine, on the outskirts of Kyiv, before sending the bodies to the morgue, Wednesday, April 6, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)
            
              FILE - Policemen work to identify civilians who were killed during the Russian occupation in Bucha, Ukraine, on the outskirts of Kyiv, before sending the bodies to the morgue, Wednesday, April 6, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)
            
              In this image from March 4, 2022, surveillance video provided by the Ukrainian government, Russian troops lead nine men at gunpoint to their headquarters on Yablunska Street in Bucha, where they would be tortured and executed. The men were picked up as part of what Russian soldiers called “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. (Ukrainian government via AP)
            
              In this image from March 4, 2022, surveillance video provided by the Ukrainian government, Russian troops lead nine men at gunpoint to their headquarters on Yablunska Street in Bucha, where they would be tortured and executed. The men were picked up as part of what Russian soldiers called “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. (Ukrainian government via AP)
            
              FILE - A lifeless body of a man with his hands tied behind his back lies on the ground in Bucha, Ukraine, Sunday, April 3, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns outside Kyiv “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              FILE - A lifeless body of a man with his hands tied behind his back lies on the ground in Bucha, Ukraine, Sunday, April 3, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns outside Kyiv “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              EDS NOTE: GRAPHIC CONTENT - FILE - Lifeless bodies of men, some with their hands tied behind their backs, lie on the ground in Bucha, Ukraine, Sunday, April 3, 2022. Russian soldiers picked up these men on March 4, 2022, as they swept the streets of Bucha to identify and neutralize potential threats. Ukrainian prosecutors now say they know who was responsible for the violence that day: Soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, who ultimately reported up to Col. Gen. Alexander Chaiko, a man known for his brutality as leader of Russia’s troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              EDS NOTE: GRAPHIC CONTENT - FILE - Lifeless bodies of men, some with their hands tied behind their backs, lie on the ground in Bucha, Ukraine, Sunday, April 3, 2022. Russian soldiers picked up these men on March 4, 2022, as they swept the streets of Bucha to identify and neutralize potential threats. Ukrainian prosecutors now say they know who was responsible for the violence that day: Soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, who ultimately reported up to Col. Gen. Alexander Chaiko, a man known for his brutality as leader of Russia’s troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              FILE - A family walks amid destroyed Russian tanks in Bucha, on the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Wednesday, April 6, 2022. Ukrainian prosecutors now say those responsible for the violence at 144 Yablunska were soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
            
              FILE - Nadiya Trubchaninova, 70, cries while holding the coffin of her son Vadym, 48, who was killed by Russian soldiers last March 30 in Bucha, during his funeral in the cemetery of Mykulychi, on the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Saturday, April 16, 2022. Trubchaninova hitchhiked daily from her village to the shattered town of Bucha trying to bring her son's body home for burial. As their advance to Kyiv stalled and losses mounted, Russian troops continued to cleanse the streets of Bucha and surrounding towns with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)
            
              FILE - Volunteers load bodies of civilians killed in Bucha onto a truck to be taken to a morgue for investigation, in the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 12, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. When Russian soldiers unable to reach Kyiv faced mounting losses, they became more erratic, conducting sweeps with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)
            
              Natalia Vlasenko buried her husband, Pavlo Vlasenko, in her yard under part of a fence, seen in this Monday, April 4, 2022, photo, in Bucha, Ukraine. Russian soldiers beat Pavlo Vlasenko to death and then set his body on fire. Days after Vlasenko buried her husband, she discovered the body of her grandson, Dmytro Chaplyhin, who was known as Dima, at a Russian headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Dima was one of at least nine men Russian soldiers picked up during a Mar. 4 sweep and later executed. (AP Photo/Vadim Girda)
            
              A neighbor comforts Natalia Vlasenko, whose husband, Pavlo Vlasenko, and grandson, Dmytro Chaplyhin, called Dima, were killed by Russian forces, as she cries in her garden in Bucha, Ukraine, Monday, April 4, 2022. Russian soldiers picked up Dima during a Mar. 4 sweep, accused him of being a spotter helping the Ukrainian military and brought him to their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Ukrainian prosecutors now say those responsible for the violence at 144 Yablunska were soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the ultimate battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
            
              The body of Dmytro Chaplyhin, called Dima, lies on the ground after it was identified by a neighbor after he was killed on the grounds of 144 Yablunska Street, an industrial complex Russian troops used as a headquarters in Bucha, Ukraine, Monday, April 4, 2022. Russian soldiers found images of Russian tanks on Dima's phone and accused him of being a spotter helping the Ukrainian military. Ukrainian prosecutors now say those responsible for the violence at 144 Yablunska were soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the ultimate battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
            
              In this undated photo provided by his family, Dmytro Chaplyhin, right, 20, poses with a friend. Russian soldiers found images of Russian tanks on Chaplyhin’s phone during a March 4, 2022, sweep of Bucha, Ukraine. They accused him of being a spotter and killed him at their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. (Vlasenko family via AP)
            
              In this undated photo provided by his family is a selfie taken by Dmytro Chaplyhin, 20, a store clerk who everyone called Dima. Dima was one of at least nine men Russian soldiers picked up during a March 4, 2022 sweep of Bucha, Ukraine, and executed at their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Ukrainian prosecutors now say they know who is responsible: soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the ultimate battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (Vlasenko family via AP)
            
              FILE - Ira Gavriluk holds her cat as she walks next to the bodies of her husband, brother, and another man, who were killed outside her home in Bucha, Ukraine, Monday, April 4, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns outside Kyiv “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. When troops unable to reach Kyiv faced mounting losses, they became more erratic, conducting their sweeps with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
            
              FILE - Municipal workers remove the body of a man who died from a house in Bucha, Ukraine, Thursday, April 7, 2022. Russians hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify potential threats. Those who didn’t pass this filtration, including volunteer fighters and civilians suspected of assisting Ukrainian troops, were tortured and executed, surveillance video, audio intercepts and interviews show. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              FILE - A dog stands next to the body of an elderly woman killed inside a house in Bucha, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 5, 2022. Russians hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify potential threats. As their advance to Kyiv stalled and losses mounted, Russian troops continued to cleanse the streets of Bucha and surrounding towns with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
            
              The basement of an office building at 144 Yablunska where civilians were held, in Bucha, Ukraine, shown on April 29, 2022. The only toilet was broken. Children cried. Adults prayed. The smell of human waste was overpowering. (AP Photo/Erika Kinetz)
            
              FILE - The lifeless body of a man lies on the ground, in Bucha, Ukraine, Sunday, April 3, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns outside Kyiv “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. When troops unable to reach Kyiv faced mounting losses, they became more erratic, conducting their sweeps with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              FILE - Policemen work to identify civilians who were killed during the Russian occupation in Bucha, Ukraine, on the outskirts of Kyiv, before sending the bodies to the morgue, Wednesday, April 6, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)
            
              In this image from March 4, 2022, surveillance video provided by the Ukrainian government, Russian troops lead nine men at gunpoint to their headquarters on Yablunska Street in Bucha, where they would be tortured and executed. The men were picked up as part of what Russian soldiers called “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. (Ukrainian government via AP)
            
              FILE - A lifeless body of a man with his hands tied behind his back lies on the ground in Bucha, Ukraine, Sunday, April 3, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns outside Kyiv “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              EDS NOTE: GRAPHIC CONTENT - FILE - Lifeless bodies of men, some with their hands tied behind their backs, lie on the ground in Bucha, Ukraine, Sunday, April 3, 2022. Russian soldiers picked up these men on March 4, 2022, as they swept the streets of Bucha to identify and neutralize potential threats. Ukrainian prosecutors now say they know who was responsible for the violence that day: Soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, who ultimately reported up to Col. Gen. Alexander Chaiko, a man known for his brutality as leader of Russia’s troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              FILE - A family walks amid destroyed Russian tanks in Bucha, on the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Wednesday, April 6, 2022. Ukrainian prosecutors now say those responsible for the violence at 144 Yablunska were soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
            
              FILE - Nadiya Trubchaninova, 70, cries while holding the coffin of her son Vadym, 48, who was killed by Russian soldiers last March 30 in Bucha, during his funeral in the cemetery of Mykulychi, on the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Saturday, April 16, 2022. Trubchaninova hitchhiked daily from her village to the shattered town of Bucha trying to bring her son's body home for burial. As their advance to Kyiv stalled and losses mounted, Russian troops continued to cleanse the streets of Bucha and surrounding towns with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)
            
              FILE - Volunteers load bodies of civilians killed in Bucha onto a truck to be taken to a morgue for investigation, in the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 12, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. When Russian soldiers unable to reach Kyiv faced mounting losses, they became more erratic, conducting sweeps with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)
            
              Natalia Vlasenko buried her husband, Pavlo Vlasenko, in her yard under part of a fence, seen in this Monday, April 4, 2022, photo, in Bucha, Ukraine. Russian soldiers beat Pavlo Vlasenko to death and then set his body on fire. Days after Vlasenko buried her husband, she discovered the body of her grandson, Dmytro Chaplyhin, who was known as Dima, at a Russian headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Dima was one of at least nine men Russian soldiers picked up during a Mar. 4 sweep and later executed. (AP Photo/Vadim Girda)
            
              A neighbor comforts Natalia Vlasenko, whose husband, Pavlo Vlasenko, and grandson, Dmytro Chaplyhin, called Dima, were killed by Russian forces, as she cries in her garden in Bucha, Ukraine, Monday, April 4, 2022. Russian soldiers picked up Dima during a Mar. 4 sweep, accused him of being a spotter helping the Ukrainian military and brought him to their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Ukrainian prosecutors now say those responsible for the violence at 144 Yablunska were soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the ultimate battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
            
              The body of Dmytro Chaplyhin, called Dima, lies on the ground after it was identified by a neighbor after he was killed on the grounds of 144 Yablunska Street, an industrial complex Russian troops used as a headquarters in Bucha, Ukraine, Monday, April 4, 2022. Russian soldiers found images of Russian tanks on Dima's phone and accused him of being a spotter helping the Ukrainian military. Ukrainian prosecutors now say those responsible for the violence at 144 Yablunska were soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the ultimate battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
            
              In this undated photo provided by his family, Dmytro Chaplyhin, right, 20, poses with a friend. Russian soldiers found images of Russian tanks on Chaplyhin’s phone during a March 4, 2022, sweep of Bucha, Ukraine. They accused him of being a spotter and killed him at their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. (Vlasenko family via AP)
            
              In this undated photo provided by his family is a selfie taken by Dmytro Chaplyhin, 20, a store clerk who everyone called Dima. Dima was one of at least nine men Russian soldiers picked up during a March 4, 2022 sweep of Bucha, Ukraine, and executed at their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Ukrainian prosecutors now say they know who is responsible: soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the ultimate battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (Vlasenko family via AP)
            
              FILE - Ira Gavriluk holds her cat as she walks next to the bodies of her husband, brother, and another man, who were killed outside her home in Bucha, Ukraine, Monday, April 4, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns outside Kyiv “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. When troops unable to reach Kyiv faced mounting losses, they became more erratic, conducting their sweeps with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
            
              FILE - Municipal workers remove the body of a man who died from a house in Bucha, Ukraine, Thursday, April 7, 2022. Russians hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify potential threats. Those who didn’t pass this filtration, including volunteer fighters and civilians suspected of assisting Ukrainian troops, were tortured and executed, surveillance video, audio intercepts and interviews show. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              FILE - A dog stands next to the body of an elderly woman killed inside a house in Bucha, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 5, 2022. Russians hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify potential threats. As their advance to Kyiv stalled and losses mounted, Russian troops continued to cleanse the streets of Bucha and surrounding towns with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
            
              The basement of an office building at 144 Yablunska where civilians were held, in Bucha, Ukraine, shown on April 29, 2022. The only toilet was broken. Children cried. Adults prayed. The smell of human waste was overpowering. (AP Photo/Erika Kinetz)
            
              FILE - The lifeless body of a man lies on the ground, in Bucha, Ukraine, Sunday, April 3, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns outside Kyiv “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. When troops unable to reach Kyiv faced mounting losses, they became more erratic, conducting their sweeps with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              In this image from March 4, 2022, surveillance video provided by the Ukrainian government, Russian troops lead nine men at gunpoint to their headquarters on Yablunska Street in Bucha, where they would be tortured and executed. The men were picked up as part of what Russian soldiers called “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. (Ukrainian government via AP)
            
              FILE - A lifeless body of a man with his hands tied behind his back lies on the ground in Bucha, Ukraine, Sunday, April 3, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns outside Kyiv “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              EDS NOTE: GRAPHIC CONTENT - FILE - Lifeless bodies of men, some with their hands tied behind their backs, lie on the ground in Bucha, Ukraine, Sunday, April 3, 2022. Russian soldiers picked up these men on March 4, 2022, as they swept the streets of Bucha to identify and neutralize potential threats. Ukrainian prosecutors now say they know who was responsible for the violence that day: Soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, who ultimately reported up to Col. Gen. Alexander Chaiko, a man known for his brutality as leader of Russia’s troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              FILE - Policemen work to identify civilians who were killed during the Russian occupation in Bucha, Ukraine, on the outskirts of Kyiv, before sending the bodies to the morgue, Wednesday, April 6, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)
            
              FILE - A family walks amid destroyed Russian tanks in Bucha, on the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Wednesday, April 6, 2022. Ukrainian prosecutors now say those responsible for the violence at 144 Yablunska were soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
            
              FILE - Nadiya Trubchaninova, 70, cries while holding the coffin of her son Vadym, 48, who was killed by Russian soldiers last March 30 in Bucha, during his funeral in the cemetery of Mykulychi, on the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Saturday, April 16, 2022. Trubchaninova hitchhiked daily from her village to the shattered town of Bucha trying to bring her son's body home for burial. As their advance to Kyiv stalled and losses mounted, Russian troops continued to cleanse the streets of Bucha and surrounding towns with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)
            
              FILE - Volunteers load bodies of civilians killed in Bucha onto a truck to be taken to a morgue for investigation, in the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 12, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. When Russian soldiers unable to reach Kyiv faced mounting losses, they became more erratic, conducting sweeps with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)
            
              Natalia Vlasenko buried her husband, Pavlo Vlasenko, in her yard under part of a fence, seen in this Monday, April 4, 2022, photo, in Bucha, Ukraine. Russian soldiers beat Pavlo Vlasenko to death and then set his body on fire. Days after Vlasenko buried her husband, she discovered the body of her grandson, Dmytro Chaplyhin, who was known as Dima, at a Russian headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Dima was one of at least nine men Russian soldiers picked up during a Mar. 4 sweep and later executed. (AP Photo/Vadim Girda)
            
              A neighbor comforts Natalia Vlasenko, whose husband, Pavlo Vlasenko, and grandson, Dmytro Chaplyhin, called Dima, were killed by Russian forces, as she cries in her garden in Bucha, Ukraine, Monday, April 4, 2022. Russian soldiers picked up Dima during a Mar. 4 sweep, accused him of being a spotter helping the Ukrainian military and brought him to their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Ukrainian prosecutors now say those responsible for the violence at 144 Yablunska were soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the ultimate battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
            
              The body of Dmytro Chaplyhin, called Dima, lies on the ground after it was identified by a neighbor after he was killed on the grounds of 144 Yablunska Street, an industrial complex Russian troops used as a headquarters in Bucha, Ukraine, Monday, April 4, 2022. Russian soldiers found images of Russian tanks on Dima's phone and accused him of being a spotter helping the Ukrainian military. Ukrainian prosecutors now say those responsible for the violence at 144 Yablunska were soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the ultimate battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
            
              In this undated photo provided by his family, Dmytro Chaplyhin, right, 20, poses with a friend. Russian soldiers found images of Russian tanks on Chaplyhin’s phone during a March 4, 2022, sweep of Bucha, Ukraine. They accused him of being a spotter and killed him at their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. (Vlasenko family via AP)
            
              In this undated photo provided by his family is a selfie taken by Dmytro Chaplyhin, 20, a store clerk who everyone called Dima. Dima was one of at least nine men Russian soldiers picked up during a March 4, 2022 sweep of Bucha, Ukraine, and executed at their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Ukrainian prosecutors now say they know who is responsible: soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the ultimate battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (Vlasenko family via AP)
            
              FILE - Ira Gavriluk holds her cat as she walks next to the bodies of her husband, brother, and another man, who were killed outside her home in Bucha, Ukraine, Monday, April 4, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns outside Kyiv “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. When troops unable to reach Kyiv faced mounting losses, they became more erratic, conducting their sweeps with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
            
              FILE - Municipal workers remove the body of a man who died from a house in Bucha, Ukraine, Thursday, April 7, 2022. Russians hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify potential threats. Those who didn’t pass this filtration, including volunteer fighters and civilians suspected of assisting Ukrainian troops, were tortured and executed, surveillance video, audio intercepts and interviews show. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              FILE - A dog stands next to the body of an elderly woman killed inside a house in Bucha, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 5, 2022. Russians hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify potential threats. As their advance to Kyiv stalled and losses mounted, Russian troops continued to cleanse the streets of Bucha and surrounding towns with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
            
              The basement of an office building at 144 Yablunska where civilians were held, in Bucha, Ukraine, shown on April 29, 2022. The only toilet was broken. Children cried. Adults prayed. The smell of human waste was overpowering. (AP Photo/Erika Kinetz)
            
              FILE - The lifeless body of a man lies on the ground, in Bucha, Ukraine, Sunday, April 3, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns outside Kyiv “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. When troops unable to reach Kyiv faced mounting losses, they became more erratic, conducting their sweeps with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              In this image from March 4, 2022, surveillance video provided by the Ukrainian government, Russian troops lead nine men at gunpoint to their headquarters on Yablunska Street in Bucha, where they would be tortured and executed. The men were picked up as part of what Russian soldiers called “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. (Ukrainian government via AP)
            
              FILE - A lifeless body of a man with his hands tied behind his back lies on the ground in Bucha, Ukraine, Sunday, April 3, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns outside Kyiv “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              EDS NOTE: GRAPHIC CONTENT - FILE - Lifeless bodies of men, some with their hands tied behind their backs, lie on the ground in Bucha, Ukraine, Sunday, April 3, 2022. Russian soldiers picked up these men on March 4, 2022, as they swept the streets of Bucha to identify and neutralize potential threats. Ukrainian prosecutors now say they know who was responsible for the violence that day: Soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, who ultimately reported up to Col. Gen. Alexander Chaiko, a man known for his brutality as leader of Russia’s troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              FILE - Policemen work to identify civilians who were killed during the Russian occupation in Bucha, Ukraine, on the outskirts of Kyiv, before sending the bodies to the morgue, Wednesday, April 6, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)
            
              FILE - A family walks amid destroyed Russian tanks in Bucha, on the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Wednesday, April 6, 2022. Ukrainian prosecutors now say those responsible for the violence at 144 Yablunska were soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
            
              FILE - Nadiya Trubchaninova, 70, cries while holding the coffin of her son Vadym, 48, who was killed by Russian soldiers last March 30 in Bucha, during his funeral in the cemetery of Mykulychi, on the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Saturday, April 16, 2022. Trubchaninova hitchhiked daily from her village to the shattered town of Bucha trying to bring her son's body home for burial. As their advance to Kyiv stalled and losses mounted, Russian troops continued to cleanse the streets of Bucha and surrounding towns with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)
            
              FILE - Volunteers load bodies of civilians killed in Bucha onto a truck to be taken to a morgue for investigation, in the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 12, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. When Russian soldiers unable to reach Kyiv faced mounting losses, they became more erratic, conducting sweeps with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)
            
              Natalia Vlasenko buried her husband, Pavlo Vlasenko, in her yard under part of a fence, seen in this Monday, April 4, 2022, photo, in Bucha, Ukraine. Russian soldiers beat Pavlo Vlasenko to death and then set his body on fire. Days after Vlasenko buried her husband, she discovered the body of her grandson, Dmytro Chaplyhin, who was known as Dima, at a Russian headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Dima was one of at least nine men Russian soldiers picked up during a Mar. 4 sweep and later executed. (AP Photo/Vadim Girda)
            
              A neighbor comforts Natalia Vlasenko, whose husband, Pavlo Vlasenko, and grandson, Dmytro Chaplyhin, called Dima, were killed by Russian forces, as she cries in her garden in Bucha, Ukraine, Monday, April 4, 2022. Russian soldiers picked up Dima during a Mar. 4 sweep, accused him of being a spotter helping the Ukrainian military and brought him to their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Ukrainian prosecutors now say those responsible for the violence at 144 Yablunska were soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the ultimate battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
            
              The body of Dmytro Chaplyhin, called Dima, lies on the ground after it was identified by a neighbor after he was killed on the grounds of 144 Yablunska Street, an industrial complex Russian troops used as a headquarters in Bucha, Ukraine, Monday, April 4, 2022. Russian soldiers found images of Russian tanks on Dima's phone and accused him of being a spotter helping the Ukrainian military. Ukrainian prosecutors now say those responsible for the violence at 144 Yablunska were soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the ultimate battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
            
              In this undated photo provided by his family, Dmytro Chaplyhin, right, 20, poses with a friend. Russian soldiers found images of Russian tanks on Chaplyhin’s phone during a March 4, 2022, sweep of Bucha, Ukraine. They accused him of being a spotter and killed him at their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. (Vlasenko family via AP)
            
              In this undated photo provided by his family is a selfie taken by Dmytro Chaplyhin, 20, a store clerk who everyone called Dima. Dima was one of at least nine men Russian soldiers picked up during a March 4, 2022 sweep of Bucha, Ukraine, and executed at their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Ukrainian prosecutors now say they know who is responsible: soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the ultimate battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (Vlasenko family via AP)
            
              FILE - Ira Gavriluk holds her cat as she walks next to the bodies of her husband, brother, and another man, who were killed outside her home in Bucha, Ukraine, Monday, April 4, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns outside Kyiv “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. When troops unable to reach Kyiv faced mounting losses, they became more erratic, conducting their sweeps with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
            
              FILE - Municipal workers remove the body of a man who died from a house in Bucha, Ukraine, Thursday, April 7, 2022. Russians hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify potential threats. Those who didn’t pass this filtration, including volunteer fighters and civilians suspected of assisting Ukrainian troops, were tortured and executed, surveillance video, audio intercepts and interviews show. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              FILE - A dog stands next to the body of an elderly woman killed inside a house in Bucha, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 5, 2022. Russians hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify potential threats. As their advance to Kyiv stalled and losses mounted, Russian troops continued to cleanse the streets of Bucha and surrounding towns with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
            
              The basement of an office building at 144 Yablunska where civilians were held, in Bucha, Ukraine, shown on April 29, 2022. The only toilet was broken. Children cried. Adults prayed. The smell of human waste was overpowering. (AP Photo/Erika Kinetz)
            
              FILE - The lifeless body of a man lies on the ground, in Bucha, Ukraine, Sunday, April 3, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns outside Kyiv “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. When troops unable to reach Kyiv faced mounting losses, they became more erratic, conducting their sweeps with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              In this image from March 4, 2022, surveillance video provided by the Ukrainian government, Russian troops lead nine men at gunpoint to their headquarters on Yablunska Street in Bucha, where they would be tortured and executed. The men were picked up as part of what Russian soldiers called “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. (Ukrainian government via AP)
            
              FILE - A lifeless body of a man with his hands tied behind his back lies on the ground in Bucha, Ukraine, Sunday, April 3, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns outside Kyiv “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              EDS NOTE: GRAPHIC CONTENT - FILE - Lifeless bodies of men, some with their hands tied behind their backs, lie on the ground in Bucha, Ukraine, Sunday, April 3, 2022. Russian soldiers picked up these men on March 4, 2022, as they swept the streets of Bucha to identify and neutralize potential threats. Ukrainian prosecutors now say they know who was responsible for the violence that day: Soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, who ultimately reported up to Col. Gen. Alexander Chaiko, a man known for his brutality as leader of Russia’s troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              FILE - Policemen work to identify civilians who were killed during the Russian occupation in Bucha, Ukraine, on the outskirts of Kyiv, before sending the bodies to the morgue, Wednesday, April 6, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)
            
              FILE - A family walks amid destroyed Russian tanks in Bucha, on the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Wednesday, April 6, 2022. Ukrainian prosecutors now say those responsible for the violence at 144 Yablunska were soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
            
              FILE - Nadiya Trubchaninova, 70, cries while holding the coffin of her son Vadym, 48, who was killed by Russian soldiers last March 30 in Bucha, during his funeral in the cemetery of Mykulychi, on the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Saturday, April 16, 2022. Trubchaninova hitchhiked daily from her village to the shattered town of Bucha trying to bring her son's body home for burial. As their advance to Kyiv stalled and losses mounted, Russian troops continued to cleanse the streets of Bucha and surrounding towns with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)
            
              FILE - Volunteers load bodies of civilians killed in Bucha onto a truck to be taken to a morgue for investigation, in the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 12, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. When Russian soldiers unable to reach Kyiv faced mounting losses, they became more erratic, conducting sweeps with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)
            
              Natalia Vlasenko buried her husband, Pavlo Vlasenko, in her yard under part of a fence, seen in this Monday, April 4, 2022, photo, in Bucha, Ukraine. Russian soldiers beat Pavlo Vlasenko to death and then set his body on fire. Days after Vlasenko buried her husband, she discovered the body of her grandson, Dmytro Chaplyhin, who was known as Dima, at a Russian headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Dima was one of at least nine men Russian soldiers picked up during a Mar. 4 sweep and later executed. (AP Photo/Vadim Girda)
            
              A neighbor comforts Natalia Vlasenko, whose husband, Pavlo Vlasenko, and grandson, Dmytro Chaplyhin, called Dima, were killed by Russian forces, as she cries in her garden in Bucha, Ukraine, Monday, April 4, 2022. Russian soldiers picked up Dima during a Mar. 4 sweep, accused him of being a spotter helping the Ukrainian military and brought him to their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Ukrainian prosecutors now say those responsible for the violence at 144 Yablunska were soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the ultimate battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
            
              The body of Dmytro Chaplyhin, called Dima, lies on the ground after it was identified by a neighbor after he was killed on the grounds of 144 Yablunska Street, an industrial complex Russian troops used as a headquarters in Bucha, Ukraine, Monday, April 4, 2022. Russian soldiers found images of Russian tanks on Dima's phone and accused him of being a spotter helping the Ukrainian military. Ukrainian prosecutors now say those responsible for the violence at 144 Yablunska were soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the ultimate battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
            
              In this undated photo provided by his family, Dmytro Chaplyhin, right, 20, poses with a friend. Russian soldiers found images of Russian tanks on Chaplyhin’s phone during a March 4, 2022, sweep of Bucha, Ukraine. They accused him of being a spotter and killed him at their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. (Vlasenko family via AP)
            
              In this undated photo provided by his family is a selfie taken by Dmytro Chaplyhin, 20, a store clerk who everyone called Dima. Dima was one of at least nine men Russian soldiers picked up during a March 4, 2022 sweep of Bucha, Ukraine, and executed at their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Ukrainian prosecutors now say they know who is responsible: soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the ultimate battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (Vlasenko family via AP)
            
              FILE - Ira Gavriluk holds her cat as she walks next to the bodies of her husband, brother, and another man, who were killed outside her home in Bucha, Ukraine, Monday, April 4, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns outside Kyiv “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. When troops unable to reach Kyiv faced mounting losses, they became more erratic, conducting their sweeps with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
            
              FILE - Municipal workers remove the body of a man who died from a house in Bucha, Ukraine, Thursday, April 7, 2022. Russians hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify potential threats. Those who didn’t pass this filtration, including volunteer fighters and civilians suspected of assisting Ukrainian troops, were tortured and executed, surveillance video, audio intercepts and interviews show. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              FILE - A dog stands next to the body of an elderly woman killed inside a house in Bucha, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 5, 2022. Russians hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify potential threats. As their advance to Kyiv stalled and losses mounted, Russian troops continued to cleanse the streets of Bucha and surrounding towns with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
            
              The basement of an office building at 144 Yablunska where civilians were held, in Bucha, Ukraine, shown on April 29, 2022. The only toilet was broken. Children cried. Adults prayed. The smell of human waste was overpowering. (AP Photo/Erika Kinetz)
            
              FILE - The lifeless body of a man lies on the ground, in Bucha, Ukraine, Sunday, April 3, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns outside Kyiv “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. When troops unable to reach Kyiv faced mounting losses, they became more erratic, conducting their sweeps with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              In this image from March 4, 2022, surveillance video provided by the Ukrainian government, Russian troops lead nine men at gunpoint to their headquarters on Yablunska Street in Bucha, where they would be tortured and executed. The men were picked up as part of what Russian soldiers called “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. (Ukrainian government via AP)
            
              FILE - A lifeless body of a man with his hands tied behind his back lies on the ground in Bucha, Ukraine, Sunday, April 3, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns outside Kyiv “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              EDS NOTE: GRAPHIC CONTENT - FILE - Lifeless bodies of men, some with their hands tied behind their backs, lie on the ground in Bucha, Ukraine, Sunday, April 3, 2022. Russian soldiers picked up these men on March 4, 2022, as they swept the streets of Bucha to identify and neutralize potential threats. Ukrainian prosecutors now say they know who was responsible for the violence that day: Soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, who ultimately reported up to Col. Gen. Alexander Chaiko, a man known for his brutality as leader of Russia’s troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              FILE - Policemen work to identify civilians who were killed during the Russian occupation in Bucha, Ukraine, on the outskirts of Kyiv, before sending the bodies to the morgue, Wednesday, April 6, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)
            
              FILE - A family walks amid destroyed Russian tanks in Bucha, on the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Wednesday, April 6, 2022. Ukrainian prosecutors now say those responsible for the violence at 144 Yablunska were soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
            
              FILE - Nadiya Trubchaninova, 70, cries while holding the coffin of her son Vadym, 48, who was killed by Russian soldiers last March 30 in Bucha, during his funeral in the cemetery of Mykulychi, on the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Saturday, April 16, 2022. Trubchaninova hitchhiked daily from her village to the shattered town of Bucha trying to bring her son's body home for burial. As their advance to Kyiv stalled and losses mounted, Russian troops continued to cleanse the streets of Bucha and surrounding towns with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)
            
              FILE - Volunteers load bodies of civilians killed in Bucha onto a truck to be taken to a morgue for investigation, in the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 12, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. When Russian soldiers unable to reach Kyiv faced mounting losses, they became more erratic, conducting sweeps with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)
            
              Natalia Vlasenko buried her husband, Pavlo Vlasenko, in her yard under part of a fence, seen in this Monday, April 4, 2022, photo, in Bucha, Ukraine. Russian soldiers beat Pavlo Vlasenko to death and then set his body on fire. Days after Vlasenko buried her husband, she discovered the body of her grandson, Dmytro Chaplyhin, who was known as Dima, at a Russian headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Dima was one of at least nine men Russian soldiers picked up during a Mar. 4 sweep and later executed. (AP Photo/Vadim Girda)
            
              A neighbor comforts Natalia Vlasenko, whose husband, Pavlo Vlasenko, and grandson, Dmytro Chaplyhin, called Dima, were killed by Russian forces, as she cries in her garden in Bucha, Ukraine, Monday, April 4, 2022. Russian soldiers picked up Dima during a Mar. 4 sweep, accused him of being a spotter helping the Ukrainian military and brought him to their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Ukrainian prosecutors now say those responsible for the violence at 144 Yablunska were soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the ultimate battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
            
              The body of Dmytro Chaplyhin, called Dima, lies on the ground after it was identified by a neighbor after he was killed on the grounds of 144 Yablunska Street, an industrial complex Russian troops used as a headquarters in Bucha, Ukraine, Monday, April 4, 2022. Russian soldiers found images of Russian tanks on Dima's phone and accused him of being a spotter helping the Ukrainian military. Ukrainian prosecutors now say those responsible for the violence at 144 Yablunska were soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the ultimate battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
            
              In this 2013 photo provided by the Vlasenko family, Pavlo Vlasenko sits with his young grandson, Dmytro Chaplyhin, who was known as Dima. Dima was one of at least nine men Russian soldiers picked up during a March 4, 2022, sweep of Bucha, Ukraine, and executed at their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Russians returned a few weeks later and found a military cap in the house. They beat Pavlo Vlasenko to death, then set his body on fire in the yard. (Vlasenko family via AP)
            
              In this undated photo provided by his family, Dmytro Chaplyhin, right, 20, poses with a friend. Russian soldiers found images of Russian tanks on Chaplyhin’s phone during a March 4, 2022, sweep of Bucha, Ukraine. They accused him of being a spotter and killed him at their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. (Vlasenko family via AP)
            
              In this undated photo provided by his family is a selfie taken by Dmytro Chaplyhin, 20, a store clerk who everyone called Dima. Dima was one of at least nine men Russian soldiers picked up during a March 4, 2022 sweep of Bucha, Ukraine, and executed at their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Ukrainian prosecutors now say they know who is responsible: soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, under the ultimate battlefield command of Alexander Chaiko, a colonel general known for his brutality as leader of Russia's troops in Syria. (Vlasenko family via AP)
            
              FILE - Ira Gavriluk holds her cat as she walks next to the bodies of her husband, brother, and another man, who were killed outside her home in Bucha, Ukraine, Monday, April 4, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns outside Kyiv “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. When troops unable to reach Kyiv faced mounting losses, they became more erratic, conducting their sweeps with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
            
              FILE - Municipal workers remove the body of a man who died from a house in Bucha, Ukraine, Thursday, April 7, 2022. Russians hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify potential threats. Those who didn’t pass this filtration, including volunteer fighters and civilians suspected of assisting Ukrainian troops, were tortured and executed, surveillance video, audio intercepts and interviews show. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              FILE - A dog stands next to the body of an elderly woman killed inside a house in Bucha, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 5, 2022. Russians hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify potential threats. As their advance to Kyiv stalled and losses mounted, Russian troops continued to cleanse the streets of Bucha and surrounding towns with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
            
              Ivan Skyba poses for a photo in Katowice, Poland, on July 16, 2022. Skyba, a taxi driver, volunteered at a Ukrainian checkpoint in Bucha, Ukraine. Russian soldiers captured Skyba and other volunteers during a March 4 sweep and took them at gunpoint to their headquarters at 144 Yablunska Street. Skyba was tortured and narrowly survived an execution by pretending to be dead. (AP Photo/Erika Kinetz)
            
              The basement of an office building at 144 Yablunska where civilians were held, in Bucha, Ukraine, shown on April 29, 2022. The only toilet was broken. Children cried. Adults prayed. The smell of human waste was overpowering. (AP Photo/Erika Kinetz)
            
              A guard walks past the entrance of 144 Yablunska Street in Bucha, Ukraine, on April 29, 2022. The office building was used as a bomb shelter before Russians took it over as a headquarters. They used it for interrogations, set up a field hospital and held civilians who didn’t pose a threat in the basement. More than a dozen bodies were found around 144 Yablunska when Russian forces retreated after their month-long occupation. (AP Photo/Erika Kinetz)
            
              FILE - The lifeless body of a man lies on the ground, in Bucha, Ukraine, Sunday, April 3, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns outside Kyiv “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. When troops unable to reach Kyiv faced mounting losses, they became more erratic, conducting their sweeps with rising levels of sometimes drunken violence. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              In this image from March 4, 2022, surveillance video provided by the Ukrainian government, Russian troops lead nine men at gunpoint to their headquarters on Yablunska Street in Bucha, where they would be tortured and executed. The men were picked up as part of what Russian soldiers called “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. (Ukrainian government via AP)
            
              FILE - Policemen work to identify civilians who were killed during the Russian occupation in Bucha, Ukraine, on the outskirts of Kyiv, before sending the bodies to the morgue, Wednesday, April 6, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)
            
              FILE - A lifeless body of a man with his hands tied behind his back lies on the ground in Bucha, Ukraine, Sunday, April 3, 2022. Russian soldiers in intercepted phone conversations called their sweeps of Bucha and other towns outside Kyiv “zachistka” – cleansing. They hunted people on lists prepared by their intelligence services and went door to door to identify and neutralize potential threats. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
            
              EDS NOTE: GRAPHIC CONTENT - FILE - Lifeless bodies of men, some with their hands tied behind their backs, lie on the ground in Bucha, Ukraine, Sunday, April 3, 2022. Russian soldiers picked up these men on March 4, 2022, as they swept the streets of Bucha to identify and neutralize potential threats. Ukrainian prosecutors now say they know who was responsible for the violence that day: Soldiers from the 76th Guards Airborne Assault Division, who ultimately reported up to Col. Gen. Alexander Chaiko, a man known for his brutality as leader of Russia’s troops in Syria. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)
How Russian soldiers ran a ‘cleansing’ operation in Bucha