In Kenya, some Maasai turn from lion-killing to Olympics


              A Maasai woman paints the face of another as they prepare to watch the Maasai Olympics in Kimana Sanctuary, southern Kenya Saturday, Dec. 10, 2022. The sports event, first held in 2012, consists of six track-and-field events based on traditional warrior skills and was created as an alternative to lion-killing as a rite of passage. (AP Photo/Brian Inganga)
            
              A Maasai man competes in the high-jump competition at the Maasai Olympics in Kimana Sanctuary, southern Kenya Saturday, Dec. 10, 2022. The sports event, first held in 2012, consists of six track-and-field events based on traditional warrior skills and was created as an alternative to lion-killing as a rite of passage. (AP Photo/Brian Inganga)
            
              Maasai women spectators watch the Maasai Olympics in Kimana Sanctuary, southern Kenya Saturday, Dec. 10, 2022. The sports event, first held in 2012, consists of six track-and-field events based on traditional warrior skills and was created as an alternative to lion-killing as a rite of passage. (AP Photo/Brian Inganga)
            
              A Maasai man throws a javelin as he competes in the Maasai Olympics in Kimana Sanctuary, southern Kenya Saturday, Dec. 10, 2022. The sports event, first held in 2012, consists of six track-and-field events based on traditional warrior skills and was created as an alternative to lion-killing as a rite of passage. (AP Photo/Brian Inganga)
            
              Maasai women spectators watch the Maasai Olympics in Kimana Sanctuary, southern Kenya Saturday, Dec. 10, 2022. The sports event, first held in 2012, consists of six track-and-field events based on traditional warrior skills and was created as an alternative to lion-killing as a rite of passage. (AP Photo/Brian Inganga)
            
              Maasai men compete in the high-jump competition at the Maasai Olympics in Kimana Sanctuary, southern Kenya Saturday, Dec. 10, 2022. The sports event, first held in 2012, consists of six track-and-field events based on traditional warrior skills and was created as an alternative to lion-killing as a rite of passage. (AP Photo/Brian Inganga)
            
              A Maasai woman adjusts the jewellery of another as they prepare to watch the Maasai Olympics in Kimana Sanctuary, southern Kenya Saturday, Dec. 10, 2022. The sports event, first held in 2012, consists of six track-and-field events based on traditional warrior skills and was created as an alternative to lion-killing as a rite of passage. (AP Photo/Brian Inganga)
            
              A Maasai man throws a javelin as he competes in the Maasai Olympics in Kimana Sanctuary, southern Kenya Saturday, Dec. 10, 2022. The sports event, first held in 2012, consists of six track-and-field events based on traditional warrior skills and was created as an alternative to lion-killing as a rite of passage. (AP Photo/Brian Inganga)
            
              A Maasai woman takes a selfie as she prepares to watch the Maasai Olympics in Kimana Sanctuary, southern Kenya Saturday, Dec. 10, 2022. The sports event, first held in 2012, consists of six track-and-field events based on traditional warrior skills and was created as an alternative to lion-killing as a rite of passage. (AP Photo/Brian Inganga)
            
              Maasai women spectators watch the Maasai Olympics in Kimana Sanctuary, southern Kenya Saturday, Dec. 10, 2022. The sports event, first held in 2012, consists of six track-and-field events based on traditional warrior skills and was created as an alternative to lion-killing as a rite of passage. (AP Photo/Brian Inganga)
In Kenya, some Maasai turn from lion-killing to Olympics