Long-cut phones ring again in Ethiopia’s Tigray, bring grief


              FILE - Displaced Tigrayans look out from a balcony next to washed clothes as women prepare "Injera" flatbread in a courtyard below, at the Hadnet General Secondary School which has become a makeshift home to thousands displaced by the conflict, in Mekele, in the Tigray region of northern Ethiopia Wednesday, May 5, 2021. For a year and a half, phone calls to people trying to survive one of the world’s worst conflicts didn’t go through. Now, as phone lines start to be restored to parts of Ethiopia’s Tigray region after a fragile peace deal, some Tigrayans are relieved while others grieve. Some say they dread receiving calls, saying they want to hear their families' voices but don't want to learn that people have died. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
            
              FILE - A man stands outside a mobile phone accessory shop in the Piazza old town area of the capital Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Thursday, Nov. 4, 2021. For a year and a half, phone calls to people trying to survive one of the world’s worst conflicts didn’t go through. Now, as phone lines start to be restored to parts of Ethiopia’s Tigray region after a fragile peace deal, some Tigrayans are relieved while others grieve. Some say they dread receiving calls, saying they want to hear their families' voices but don't want to learn that people have died. (AP Photo, File)
            
              FILE - People walk from a rural area towards a nearby town where a food distribution operated by the Relief Society of Tigray was taking place, near the town of Agula, in the Tigray region of northern Ethiopia on May 8, 2021. For a year and a half, phone calls to people trying to survive one of the world’s worst conflicts didn’t go through. Now, as phone lines start to be restored to parts of Ethiopia’s Tigray region after a fragile peace deal, some Tigrayans are relieved while others grieve. Some say they dread receiving calls, saying they want to hear their families' voices but don't want to learn that people have died. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
            
              FILE - Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director General of the World Health Organization (WHO), gestures as he speaks to journalists during a press conference organized by the Geneva Association of United Nations Correspondents (ACANU) at the World Health Organization (WHO) headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2022. In recent days, social media has been flooded by posts from Tigrayans who say they have learned of the deaths of loved ones. The most prominent was World Health Organization director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP, File)
Long-cut phones ring again in Ethiopia’s Tigray, bring grief