Loss of tiny organisms hurts ocean, fishing, scientists say


              FILE-A lobster guards the entrance to a lobster trap on the floor of the Atlantic Ocean off Biddeford, Maine, in this Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2018 photo. Research shows a drop in productivity of phytoplankton in the Gulf of Maine, a development that can disrupt valuable fishing industries for species such as lobsters and scallops. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, files)
            
              FILE-A lobster fishing boat heads out to sea off South Portland, Maine, at sunrise in this July 27, 2018 file photo. The growing warmth and saltiness of the Gulf of Maine is creating a slew unwanted challenges for the state's fishing industry. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, files)
            
              FILE-A school of baitfish swims off the coast of Biddeford, Maine, in this Sept. 3, 2018 file photo. Research shows that growth rates of phytoplankton, the primary food source of small fish and crustaceans, is slowing down in the Gulf of Maine, posing challenges for the rest of the ecosystem. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, files)
Loss of tiny organisms hurts ocean, fishing, scientists say