Memphis nonprofit puts money behind drive to curb gun deaths


              CORRECTS TO EZEKIEL KELLY NOT EZEKEIL KELLY FILE - Ezekiel Kelly, left makes his first court appearance on Friday, Sept. 9, 2022 in Memphis, Tenn. Kelly is accused of killing three people, wounding three others and bringing Memphis to a terrified standstill in early September. (Mark Weber/Daily Memphian via AP, File)
            
              CORRECTS SPELLING TO REV. EARLE FISHER NOT REV. EARL FISCHER Rev. Earle Fisher, of the Abyssinian Missionary Baptist Church, poses by an unfinished portrait of Christ on a wall of the facility Oct. 25, 2022, in Memphis, Tenn. Fisher, whose colleague Autura Eason-Williams was among the victims of gun violence in Memphis, said he was skeptical that non-profit Youth Villages can succeed in helping to reduce shootings in the city because they have not done this kind of work before. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
            
              FILE - People watch as police officers work at an active shooter scene on Poplar Avenue in Memphis, Tenn. Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2022. Ezekiel Kelly is now accused of killing three people, wounding three others and bringing Memphis to a terrified standstill that early September night. (Mark Weber/Daily Memphian via AP, File)
            
              FILE - Police officers work an active shooter scene on Poplar Avenue in Memphis, Tenn. on Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2022. Ezekiel Kelly is now accused of killing three people, wounding three others and bringing Memphis to a terrified standstill that early September night. (Mark Weber/Daily Memphian via AP, File)
            
              FILE - Ezekeil Kelly, left makes his first court appearance on Friday, Sept. 9, 2022 in Memphis, Tenn. Kelly is accused of killing three people, wounding three others and bringing Memphis to a terrified standstill in early September. (Mark Weber/Daily Memphian via AP, File)
            
              Rev. Earl Fischer, of the Abyssinian Missionary Baptist Church, poses by an unfinished portrait of Christ on a wall of the facility Oct. 25, 2022, in Memphis, Tenn. Fisher, whose colleague Autura Eason-Williams was among the victims of gun violence in Memphis, said he was skeptical that non-profit Youth Villages can succeed in helping to reduce shootings in the city because they have not done this kind of work before. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
            
              Valentino Smith, right, shows information found on the Internet to Carl Davis, director of operations, seated at right, during a Memphis Allies incident review meeting on Oct. 24, 2022, in Memphis, Tenn. In the meeting, the staff reviews recent shootings in the area and tries to find information about people involved by searching social media and other leads on line. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
            
              Florence Brooks, a life coach with Memphis Allies, talks about her role in the organization on Oct. 24, 2022, in Memphis, Tenn. Memphis Allies is a new initiative that fights gun violence by using messengers who connect with people most at risk of involvement in gun violence and provide them with counseling services for everything ranging from housing to job training. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
            
              Tony Matthews, right, and Florence Brooks, center, hand out fliers in an apartment complex about an upcoming event sponsored by anti gun violence group Memphis Allies on Oct. 24, 2022, in Memphis, Tenn. Both Matthews and Brooks are life coaches with the organization. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
            
              Vinessa Brown, leader of operations at LifeLine to Success, talks about the fight against gun violence Oct. 24, 2022, in Memphis, Tenn. The organization has more than a decade of experience serving people returning from prison and helping them start new lives. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
            
              E. Matthis, center, an outreach specialist with Memphis Allies, takes part in a meeting to discuss information on recent area shootings Oct. 24, 2022, in Memphis, Tenn. At left is Bryan Mathis and at right is Eric Hammond. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
            
              In this image provided by Youth Villages, Pat Lawler, chief executive officer of the non-profit Youth Villages, speaks at a meeting in Memphis on Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022. For Lawler, the gun deaths that bedeviled Memphis in 2020 was a breaking point. (Matt Mauck/Youth Villages via AP)
            
              FILE - A bicyclist and motorists make their way down Poplar Ave. at the McLean Blvd. intersection, Thursday, Sept. 8, 2022, in Memphis, Tenn. The area is one of the places Ezekiel Kelly is accused of live streaming himself while driving around Memphis shooting at people. (AP Photo/John Amis, File)
            
              Tanita Hilliard sits for a portrait on Oct. 25, 2022, in Memphis, Tenn. When a young man live streamed himself driving around Memphis and shooting at people, she recognized the man as Ezekiel Kelly, one of her former middle school students. Kelly is accused of killing three people and injuring three others. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
Memphis nonprofit puts money behind drive to curb gun deaths