Migrants feel inflation’s squeeze twice — at home and abroad


              People order Egyptian food at Hadoota Masreya Restaurant in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, Sept. 5, 2022. The restaurant employs Egyptian chefs and waiters but caters to a wide variety of customers from around the world. “I have a lot of staff whose families rely on the income they make from the restaurant and a big portion of their incomes are sent back home so people there can live," said Mohamed Younis, manager at the restaurant. (AP Photo/Malak Harb)
            
              A man fills out forms at a money transfer business in the Queens borough of New York, Thursday, Oct. 6, 2022. Inflation isn't affecting people equally. For migrants with relatives relying on money they send back, higher prices are pinching families twice: at home and abroad. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
            
              Mahdi Warsama stands for a portrait at the Franklin Library in Minneapolis, Minn., on Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2022. An American citizen who works for the nonprofit Somali Parents Autism Network, Warsama estimates he sent $1,500 last month to help relatives in Somalia pay for necessities like food and water for themselves and their livestock. (AP Photo/Trisha Ahmed)
            
              Mohamed Younis, the manager of Hadoota Masreya Restaurant, checks his phone, in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, Sept. 5, 2022. The restaurant employs Egyptian chefs and waiters but caters to a wide variety of customers from around the world. “I have a lot of staff whose families rely on the income they make from the restaurant and a big portion of their incomes are sent back home so people there can live," said Younis. (AP Photo/Malak Harb)
            
              Driver Carlos Huerta, originally from Puebla, Mexico, gets ready for a pick-up in the Queens borough of New York, Thursday, Oct. 6, 2022. Huerta has been living apart from his wife and kids for nearly 20 years, picking up jobs from dish-washing to driving executives. He said he sends about $200 a week to his wife and mother in Mexico. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
            
              Ali el-Sayyed Mohammed takes an order from customers at Hadoota Masreya Restaurant in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, Sept. 5, 2022. Mohammed left his hometown of Beheira along the Egyptian Nile Delta this year to come to Dubai in the hopes of earning a living wage. The 26-year-old said he is supporting his mother and sisters back home and hoping to save enough to get married. (AP Photo/Malak Harb)
Migrants feel inflation’s squeeze twice — at home and abroad