Qatar offers World Cup visitors an introduction to Islam


              Men pray at Katara "blue" mosque, in Doha, Qatar, Thursday, Nov. 24, 2022. (AP Photo/IJorge Saenz)
            
              Police pray as they wait ahead of the World Cup quarterfinal soccer match between Morocco and Portugal, at Al Thumama Stadium in Doha, Qatar, Saturday, Dec. 10, 2022. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)
            
              A woman with her son looks at a screen during a visit to Islamic Art Museum in Doha, in Doha, Qatar, Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2022. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)
            
              Virag Sarkadi, left, a 19 years old Hungarian tourist, visits Katara mosque in Doha, Qatar, Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2022. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)
            
              A visitor looks to an object at the Islamic Art Museum in Doha, in Doha, Qatar, Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2022. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)
            
              A woman with her son looks to an object at Islamic Art Museum in Doha, in Doha, Qatar, Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2022. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)
            
              Men pray before the World Cup, group A soccer match between Qatar and Ecuador at the Al Bayt Stadium in Doha, Sunday, Nov. 20, 2022. (AP Photo/)
            
              Two guards walk near Katara "Blue" mosque, in Doha, Qatar, Thursday, Dec. 8, 2022. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)
            
              Hungarian tourists take pictures at Katara mosque, in Doha, Qatar, Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2022. Up to 1 million visitors have come to Qatar during the World Cup. For many it's their first visit to a Muslim country. Those who don't venture far beyond the stadiums and Doha's glitzy hotels will have only limited exposure to the country's religion, such as hearing the call to prayer at a distance or witnessing Muslims prostrate at prayer rooms in stadiums, airports and hotels. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)
            
              People pray at Katara beach, in Doha, Qatar, Monday, Nov. 28, 2022. Up to 1 million visitors have come to Qatar during the World Cup. For many it's their first visit to a Muslim country. Those who don't venture far beyond the stadiums and Doha's glitzy hotels will have only limited exposure to the country's religion, such as hearing the call to prayer at a distance or witnessing Muslims prostrate at prayer rooms in stadiums, airports and hotels. But for those who are curious to find out more about Islam, Qatari authorities and religious officials are eager to help. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)
            
              A Hungarian tourist, takes pictures at Katara mosque in Doha, Qatar, Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2022. Up to 1 million visitors have come to Qatar during the World Cup. For many it's their first visit to a Muslim country. Those who don't venture far beyond the stadiums and Doha's glitzy hotels will have only limited exposure to the country's religion, such as hearing the call to prayer at a distance or witnessing Muslims prostrate at prayer rooms in stadiums, airports and hotels. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)
            
              Guide Riffat Ishfaq, left from Pakistan embraces tourist Fatima Gracia from El Salvador, in Doha, Qatar, Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2022. In Qatar to enjoy the World Cup with friends, Gracia, the Salvadoran visitor took a day off from soccer to go sightseeing at the Katara mosque, where preachers have been introducing Islam in multiple languages to curious fans from around the world. (AP Photo/Jorge Saenz)
Qatar offers World Cup visitors an introduction to Islam