Rural voters ‘in the trenches’ on climate, leery of Biden


              FILE - A man makes the long walk down the Folsom Lake boat ramp that is normally underwater in Folsom, Calif., Oct. 3, 2022. The reservoir is filled to about 70% of its historical average as California began its new water year that started Oct. 1. The impacts of climate change hit communities across the country, yet voters in rural areas are the least likely to feel Washington is in their corner on the issue. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
            
              FILE - Dust flies as a farmer plows over a failed cotton field, Oct. 4, 2022, in Halfway, Texas. Drought and extreme heat have severely damaged much of the cotton harvest in the U.S., which produces roughly 35% of the world's crop. The impacts of climate change hit communities across the country, yet voters in rural areas are the least likely to feel Washington is in their corner on the issue. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)
            
              FILE - People walk to Tower Rock, an attraction normally surrounded by the Mississippi River and only accessible by boat, Oct. 19, 2022, in Perry County, Mo. Foot traffic to the rock formation has been made possible because of near record low water levels along the river. The impacts of climate change hit communities across the country, yet voters in rural areas are the least likely to feel Washington is in their corner on the issue. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)
Rural voters ‘in the trenches’ on climate, leery of Biden