Russia scrubs Mariupol’s Ukraine identity, builds on death


              FILE - Damaged and burned buildings are seen from an open window of a new apartment block that is being built with support of the Russia Defense Ministry in Mariupol, in territory under control of the government of the Donetsk People's Republic, in eastern Ukraine, Wednesday, July 13, 2022. This photo was taken during a trip organized by the Russian Ministry of Defense. (AP Photo/File)
            
              FILE - This combination of satellite images provided by Maxar Technologies shows the destroyed Mariupol, Ukraine Theater on March 29, 2022, top, and a screen built around it seen on Nov. 30, 2022. (Maxar Technologies via AP, File)
            
              FILE - This combination of satellite images provided by Maxar Technologies shows a site before the construction of new Russian military facility in Mariupol, Ukraine, on March 29, 2022, top, and on Nov. 30, 2022. (Maxar Technologies via AP, File)
            
              Inna Nepomnyshaya looks at a photo of her apartment building at 110 Mytropolytska St. in Mariupol, Ukraine, as it was struck by Russian tank fire in March 11, 2022, during an interview in Dnipro, Ukraine, on Nov. 22, 2022, where she has settled after fleeing her home. The shell shattered the walls of Nepomnyshaya’s apartment and obliterated those of the neighbors above, below and behind her. (AP Photo/Vasilisa Stepanenko)
            
              A child from Mariupol plays at the library in Dnipro, Ukraine, on Nov. 22, 2022. The library has been transformed into a center for refugees from Mariupol since the city's capture by Russian forces in the spring. (AP Photo/Vasilisa Stepanenko)
            
              In exile in Dnipro, Ukraine, Petro Andryushchenko, an aide to the mayor of Mariupol, Ukraine, speaks about Mariupol's transformation under Russian occupation, on Nov. 22, 2022. He and many others from the occupied city have settled here, and hope their home will be liberated. Dnipro's library, where he spoke, has been transformed into a center for refugees from Mariupol. (AP Photo/Vasilisa Stepanenko)
            
              In this photo provided by the family, Iryna Kalinin stands in front of a Christmas tree during her pregnancy. She and her unborn first child were killed after a Russian airstrike hit a Mariupol maternity hospital while she was in labor on March 9, 2022. Her husband, Ivan, returned to the city to rebury his wife and their baby. (Family photo via AP)
            
              This photo provided by the family shows Ivan and Iryna Kalinin before the Feb. 24, 2022, start of the Russian invasion of Ukraine. Iryna and their unborn child were killed in a Russian airstrike on Mariupol's maternity hospital. Ivan returned to the occupied city to rebury his wife and baby. (Family photo via AP)
            
              This 2022 photo shows one of the at least 14 apartment buildings Russians have constructed in the occupied Ukrainian city of Mariupol. Residents say there's a waitlist of more than 11,000 people for a new apartment. Most of the city's housing stock was hit by munitions during the siege of the city earlier in the year. (AP Photo)
            
              This photo provided by the family shows the graves of two young cousins, Artem and Angelina Erashov, who were killed in Mariupol, Ukraine, during Russian shelling on March 9, 2022. Their parents fled Mariupol soon after but returned to the occupied city in July to rebury the children, ages 5 and 7, in the Staryi Krym cemetery, now the site of thousands of new graves since the Russian invasion began Feb. 24. (Family photo via AP)
            
              This pre-war photo provided by the family shows 5-year-old Artem Erashov, with his father, Volodymyr. The boy and his 7-year-old cousin, Angelina, were killed during Russian shelling on March 9, 2022. The families of the young cousins returned to occupied Mariupol to rebury their children in the Staryi Krym cemetery, now the site of thousands of new graves since the Russian invasion began Feb. 24. (Family photo via AP)
            
              This pre-war photo provided by the family shows 5-year-old Artem Erashov, with his mother, Lydya. The boy and his 7-year-old cousin, Angelina, were killed during Russian shelling on March 9, 2022. The families of the young cousins returned to occupied Mariupol to rebury their children in the Staryi Krym cemetery, now the site of thousands of new graves since the Russian invasion began Feb. 24. (Family photo via AP)
            
              This photo provided by the family shows the coffins of two young cousins, Artem and Angelina Erashov, who were killed in Mariupol, Ukraine, during Russian shelling on March 9, 2022. Their parents fled Mariupol soon after but returned to the occupied city in July to rebury the children, ages 5 and 7, in the Staryi Krym cemetery, now the site of thousands of new graves since the Russian invasion began Feb. 24. (Family photo via AP)
            
              FILE - This combination of satellite images provided by Maxar Technologies shows damaged residential apartment buildings in the Livoberezhnyi district of Mariupol, Ukraine, on March 29, 2022, top, and on Nov. 30, 2022, after they were torn down. (Maxar Technologies via AP, File)
            
              FILE - A construction worker works on the site of the new municipal medical center in Mariupol with an Orthodox church in the background, in territory under control of the government of the Donetsk People's Republic, in eastern Ukraine, Wednesday, July 13, 2022. This photo was taken during a trip organized by the Russian Ministry of Defense. (AP Photo/File)
            
              FILE - A bus stops in front of an apartment building damaged during a heavy fighting in Mariupol, Donetsk People's Republic, Ukraine, Friday, Nov. 4, 2022. (AP Photo/Alexei Alexandrov, File)
            
              FILE - Foreign journalists look inside a new unit in a new apartment block that is being built with the support of the Russia Defense Ministry in Mariupol, in territory under control of the government of the Donetsk People's Republic, in eastern Ukraine, Wednesday, July 13, 2022. This photo was taken during a trip organized by the Russian Ministry of Defense. (AP Photo/File)
            
              FILE - Workers build an apartment building for residents of Mariupol affected by hostilities, in Mariupol, in territory under control of the government of the Donetsk People's Republic, in eastern Ukraine, Friday, July 1, 2022. (AP Photo/File)
            
              The remains of a statue and other rubble lie in front of the Azovstal steel mill, which was the last place in the Ukrainian city of Mariupol to fall to Russian forces in late May 2022. A Russian master plan for the city envisions restoring the destroyed factory as an industrial park, but there are no signs any work has begun. (AP Photo)
            
              FILE - A Russian soldier inspects a corridor in the Azovstal steel mill in Mariupol, in territory under control of the government of the Donetsk People's Republic, in eastern Ukraine, Monday, June 13, 2022. This photo was taken during a trip organized by the Russian Ministry of Defense. (AP Photo/File)
            
              FILE - This combination of satellite images provided by Maxar Technologies shows the Staryi Krym cemetery in Mariupol, Ukraine, on March 29, 2022, top, and additional graves seen on Nov. 30, 2022. (Maxar Technologies via AP, File)
            
              This Nov. 16, 2022 image from video shows some of the new graves which have been dug since the Russian siege began, at the Staryi Krym cemetery on the outskirts of the occupied Ukrainian city of Mariupol. Most are marked only by number. The Associated Press estimated at least 10,300 new graves in and around Mariupol — 8,500 in this cemetery — by analyzing satellite imagery from early March through December, noting sections where the earth had been disturbed. (AP Photo)
            
              FILE - Local actors rehearse Russian playwright Anton Chekhov's Vaudeville play on the stage of the Philharmonic in Mariupol, in territory under control of the government of the Donetsk People's Republic, in eastern Ukraine, Sunday, June 12, 2022. This photo was taken during a trip organized by the Russian Ministry of Defense. (AP Photo/File)
            
              This Dec. 2, 2022 image from video shows fencing surrounding the Drama Theater in Mariupol, Ukraine. Months after hundreds died in Russian airstrikes on the theater, the fencing is etched with Russian and Ukrainian literary figures as well as an outline of the theater's previous life, before Russian occupation. (AP Photo)
            
              This March 26, 2022 image from video shows the makeshift graves of two women who were killed at 110 Mytropolytska St. in the Ukrainian city of Mariupol when a Russian tank opened fire on their building on March 11. Residents say the city was full of makeshift graves such as these, with thousands killed during the Russian siege. (AP Photo)
            
              FILE - An explosion erupts from an apartment building at 110 Mytropolytska St., after a Russian army tank fired on it in Mariupol, Ukraine, Friday, March 11, 2022. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka, File)
            
              FILE - A woman walks past a burning apartment building after shelling in Mariupol, Ukraine, Sunday, March 13, 2022. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka, File)
            
              FILE - A Russian soldier guards the site of a new apartment building which is is being built with the support of the Russian Defense Ministry, in Mariupol, in territory under control of the government of the Donetsk People's Republic, in eastern Ukraine, Wednesday, July 13, 2022. This photo was taken during a trip organized by the Russian Ministry of Defense. (AP Photo/File)
Russia scrubs Mariupol’s Ukraine identity, builds on death