Russia’s war at 6 months: A global economy in growing danger


              FILE- Malian women sift wheat in a field near Segou, central Mali, Jan. 22, 2013. It's been six months since Russia invaded Ukraine, and the consequences are posing a devastating threat to the global economy. Governments, businesses and families worldwide are feeling the effects just two years after the coronavirus pandemic ravaged global trade. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay, File)
            
              FILE - Farmers offload livestock manure from a truck, that will be used to fertilize crops due to the increased cost of fertilizer that they say they now can't afford to purchase, in Kiambu, near Nairobi, in Kenya, March 31, 2022. It's been six months since Russia invaded Ukraine, and the consequences are posing a devastating threat to the global economy. Governments, businesses and families worldwide are feeling the effects just two years after the coronavirus pandemic ravaged global trade. (AP Photo/Brian Inganga, File)
            
              A woman carries shopping bags after shopping for food at a market in Jakarta, Indonesia, Sunday, Aug 14, 2022. In the six months since Russia invaded Ukraine, the fallout from the war has had huge effects on the global economy. Though intertwined with other forces, the war has made problems like inflation much worse for people around the world. Soaring food and energy prices have turned into crises that are threatening to plunge millions of people into poverty and make recessions ever more likely.  (AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim)
            
              A fruit vender sells pineapples in a market in Hanoi, Vietnam on Sunday, Aug. 14, 2022.  In the six months since Russia invaded Ukraine, the fallout from the war has had huge effects on the global economy. Though intertwined with other forces, the war has made problems like inflation much worse for people around the world. Soaring food and energy prices have turned into crises that are threatening to plunge millions of people into poverty and make recessions ever more likely. (AP Photo/Hau Dinh)
            
              A galvanized chain is pictured in the Zinkpower galvanizing company in Meckenheim, Germany, Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022. In the six months since Russia invaded Ukraine, the fallout from the war has had huge effects on the global economy. Germany may have to impose gas rationing that could cripple industries from steelmaking to pharmaceuticals to commercial laundries. "If they say, we're cutting you off, all my equipment will be destroyed," said Kopf, who's also chair of Germany’s association of zinc galvanizing firms. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)
            
              People shop for food in a market in Hanoi, Vietnam on Sunday, Aug. 14, 2022. In the six months since Russia invaded Ukraine, the fallout from the war has had huge effects on the global economy. Though intertwined with other forces, the war has made problems like inflation much worse for people around the world. Soaring food and energy prices have turned into crises that are threatening to plunge millions of people into poverty and make recessions ever more likely. (AP Photo/Hau Dinh)
            
              A woman stops to browse for clothing, at a market in Jakarta, Indonesia, Sunday, Aug 14, 2022. In the six months since Russia invaded Ukraine, the fallout from the war has had huge effects on the global economy. Though intertwined with other forces, the war has made problems like inflation much worse for people around the world. Soaring food and energy prices have turned into crises that are threatening to plunge millions of people into poverty and make recessions ever more likely. (AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim)
            
              Street food vendor Warunee Deejai prepares food ingredients for customers in Bangkok, Thailand, Thursday, Aug. 11, 2022. In the six months since Russia invaded Ukraine, the fallout from the war has had huge effects on the global economy. In Bangkok, rising costs for pork, vegetables and oil have forced Warunee Deejai, a street-food vendor, to raise prices, cut staff and work longer hours. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
            
              Metal pieces are galvanized in a galvanizing company in Meckenheim, Germany, Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022. In the six months since Russia invaded Ukraine, the fallout from the war has had huge effects on the global economy. Germany may have to impose gas rationing that could cripple industries from steelmaking to pharmaceuticals to commercial laundries. "If they say, we're cutting you off, all my equipment will be destroyed," said Kopf, who's also chair of Germany’s association of zinc galvanizing firms. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)
            
              A worker moves metal pieces that are hot-dip galvanized in the Zinkpower galvanizing company in Meckenheim, Germany, Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022. In the six months since Russia invaded Ukraine, the fallout from the war has had huge effects on the global economy. Germany may have to impose gas rationing that could cripple industries from steelmaking to pharmaceuticals to commercial laundries. "If they say, we're cutting you off, all my equipment will be destroyed," said Kopf, who's also chair of Germany’s association of zinc galvanizing firms. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)
            
              People shop for food in a market in Hanoi, Vietnam on Sunday, Aug. 14, 2022.  In the six months since Russia invaded Ukraine, the fallout from the war has had huge effects on the global economy. Though intertwined with other forces, the war has made problems like inflation much worse for people around the world. Soaring food and energy prices have turned into crises that are threatening to plunge millions of people into poverty and make recessions ever more likely. (AP Photo/Hau Dinh)
            
              A vendor waits for customers at his stall that sells rice and other grains at a market in Jakarta, Indonesia, Sunday, Aug. 14, 2022. In the six months since Russia invaded Ukraine, the fallout from the war has had huge effects on the global economy. Soaring food and energy prices have turned into crises that are threatening to plunge millions of people into poverty and make recessions ever more likely. Syahrul Yasin Limpo, Indonesia's agriculture minister, warned this month that the price of instant noodles, a staple in the Southeast Asian nation, might triple because of inflated wheat prices. (AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim)
            
              Street food vendor Warunee Deejai cooks lunch for customers in Bangkok, Thailand, Thursday, Aug. 11, 2022. In the six months since Russia invaded Ukraine, the fallout from the war has had huge effects on the global economy. Though intertwined with other forces, the war has made problems like inflation much worse for people around the world. In Bangkok, rising costs for pork, vegetables and oil have forced Warunee Deejai, a street-food vendor, to raise prices, cut staff and work longer hours. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Russia’s war at 6 months: A global economy in growing danger