Scientists: Atmospheric carbon might turn lakes more acidic


              FILE - A fishing boat heads into the harbor at Oswego, N.Y., from Lake Ontario on Sept. 10, 2004. Studies predict the Great Lakes and other large freshwater bodies around the world will move toward acidity as they absorb excess carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, which also causes climate change. Experts say acidification could disrupt aquatic food chains and habitat. (Harrison Wilde/The Palladium-Times via AP, File)
            
              In this photo provided by the Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration scientist Stephanie Gandulla, left, and Michigan Sea Grant intern Cassidy Beach collect Lake Huron water samples from a research vessel on June 3, 2022, near Alpena, Mich. They are working on a multi-year project at Thunder Bay Marine Sanctuary to determine whether the lake is becoming more acidic. (Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary/NOAA via AP)
            
              In this photo provided by the Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary, Michigan Sea Grant intern Cassidy Beach takes water samples from a Lake Huron pier on July 6, 2022, in Alpena, Mich. Beach was assisting a multi-year project at Thunder Bay Marine Sanctuary to determine whether the lake is becoming more acidic. (Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary/NOAA via AP)
            
              In this photo provided by Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary, Michigan Sea Grant intern Cassidy Beach collects Lake Huron water samples aboard a research vessel on July 13, 2022, near Alpena, Mich. Beach was assisting a multi-year project at Thunder Bay Marine Sanctuary to determine whether the lake is becoming more acidic. (Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary/NOAA via AP)
            
              FILE - A scientist with the Hammond Bay Biological Station near Huron Beach, Mich., holds a female sea lamprey, July 16, 2010. The Great Lakes have endured a lot the past century, from supersized algae blobs to invasive mussels and bloodsucking sea lamprey that nearly wiped out fish populations. Now, another danger: They, and other big lakes around the world, might be getting more acidic, which could make them less hospitable for some fish and plants. (AP Photo/John Flesher, File)
            
              FILE - The sun sets over the Mackinac Bridge, the dividing line between Lake Michigan and Lake Huron, at Michigan's Mackinac Straits on May 31, 2002. Studies predict the Great Lakes and other large freshwater bodies around the world will move toward acidity as they absorb excess carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, which also causes climate change. Experts say acidification could disrupt aquatic food chains and habitat. (AP Photo/Al Goldis, File)
            
              FILE - A man jumps into Lake Michigan to cool off on July 20, 2022, with the downtown Chicago skyline seen in the background. Studies predict the Great Lakes and other large freshwater bodies around the world will move toward acidity as they absorb excess carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, which also causes climate change. Experts say acidification could disrupt aquatic food chains and habitat. (AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato, File)
            
              FILE - Algae floats on the surface of Lake Erie's Maumee Bay in Oregon, Ohio, Sept. 15, 2017. The Great Lakes have endured a lot the past century, from supersized algae blobs to invasive mussels and bloodsucking sea lamprey that nearly wiped out fish populations. Now, another danger: They, and other big lakes around the world, might be getting more acidic, which could make them less hospitable for some fish and plants. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)
            
              FILE - A young boy plays in the surf by the shore of Lake Ontario in Toronto on Jan. 21, 2021. Studies predict the Great Lakes and other large freshwater bodies around the world will move toward acidity as they absorb excess carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, which also causes climate change. Experts say acidification could disrupt aquatic food chains and habitat. (Frank Gunn/The Canadian Press via AP, File)
Scientists: Atmospheric carbon might turn lakes more acidic