Spy agencies urged to fix open secret: a lack of diversity


              In this image provided by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, diversity leaders with the Office of the Director of National Intelligence Sherry Van Sloun, left, and Stephanie La Rue pose for a photo in Virginia, on May 12, 2022. The national reckoning over racial inequality sparked by George Floyd's murder two years ago has gone on behind closed doors inside America's intelligence agencies. Publicly available data, published studies of its diversity programs, and interviews with retired officers indicate spy agencies have not lived up to years of commitments made by their top leaders, who often say diversity is a national security imperative.  (Office of the Director of National Intelligence via AP)
            
              FILE - A sign stands outside the National Security Administration (NSA) campus on in Fort Meade, Md., on June 6, 2013. The national reckoning over racial inequality sparked by George Floyd's murder two years ago has gone on behind closed doors inside America's intelligence agencies. Shortly after his death, employees of the National Security Agency had a call to speak to their director about racism and cultural misunderstandings. One by one, officers spoke about examples of racism that they had seen in America's largest intelligence service.(AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)
Spy agencies urged to fix open secret: a lack of diversity