‘The money is gone’: Bahamas tries to turn page after FTX


              FILE - Sam Bankman-Fried, center left, founder of the failed cryptocurrency exchange FTX, is escorted out of Magistrate Court after a hearing in Nassau, Bahamas, Monday, Dec. 19, 2022. FTX was supposed to be the crown jewel of the Bahamian government's push to be the global destination for all things crypto, after years of having an economy overly reliant on tourism and banking. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell, File)
            
              Bishop Lawrence Rolle performs at a Christmas concert at Mt. Carmel Preparatory Academy in Nassau, Bahamas on Thursday, Dec. 8, 2022. Rolle raises money through his Afro-Caribbean gospel music performances, which he uses to feed 2,500 people at week. (AP Photo/Ken Sweet)
            
              Bishop Lawrence Rolle looks over toys and supplies in his trailer on Thursday, Dec. 8, 2022, in Over-The-Hill, a neighborhood in Nassau, Bahamas. Part of a $50,000 donation that cryptocurrency exchange FTX made to Rolle's ministry went toward restoring the trailer. (AP Photo/Ken Sweet)
            
              The British Colonial hotel in Nassau, Bahamas, best known for being the site of the James Bond movie "Never Say Never Again," is shown on Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2022. The hotel was boarded up after the Bahamian government closed the country off from tourists during the pandemic. (AP Photo/Ken Sweet)
            
              Little remains on a lot in Nassau, Bahamas, shown on Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2022, where cryptocurrency exchange FTX broke ground on its headquarters in April. The country's prime minister, Philip Davis, participated in the groundbreaking ceremony, along with Sam Bankman-Fried, the head of FTX. (AP Photo/Ken Sweet)
            
              Bishop Lawrence Rolle performs in front of children and adults at Mt. Carmel Preparatory Academy in Nassau, Bahamas on Thursday, Dec. 8, 2022. Rolle's ministry received $50,000 from FTX in early 2022, one of several donations the cryptocurrency exchange made to the Bahamian people when it relocated to the Caribbean island nation in 2021. (AP Photo/Ken Sweet)
‘The money is gone’: Bahamas tries to turn page after FTX