Twinkle, twinkle fading stars: Hiding in our brighter skies


              FILE - A view from the camping platform Cedar Hammock on the east side of the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge picks up light pollution from the Southeast of the refuge, Wednesday, March 30, 2022, in Folkston, Ga. Only the Stephen C. Foster State Park, on the West side of the refuge, is a certified dark sky park by the International Dark Sky Association. (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)
            
              FILE - Dave Cooke observes the Milky Way over a frozen fish sanctuary in central Ontario, north of Highway 36 in Kawartha Lakes, Ontario, Canada, early Sunday, March 21, 2021. According to research published in the journal Science on Thursday, Jan. 19, 2023, every year the night sky grows brighter, and the stars look dimmer. Analyzing data from more than 50,000 citizen scientists, or amateur stargazers, reveals that artificial lighting is making the night sky about 10% brighter each year, a faster rate of change that scientists had previously estimated looking at satellite data. (Fred Thornhill/The Canadian Press via AP)
Twinkle, twinkle fading stars: Hiding in our brighter skies