Ukrainians face nuclear threat with grit and dark humor


              Dmytro Bondarenko shows the storage area under his fold-up bed filled with nonperishable food as he demonstrates his readiness for Russia's nuclear threat in his apartment in Kyiv, Ukraine, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022. Ukrainians no longer ask if their country will be hit by Russia with nuclear weapons. They are preparing for it. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)
            
              The bed where Tamara sleeps is photographed inside a room where she has been sleeping for more than 8 months, along with other ten permanent residents, on the ground floor of her building in Mykolaiv downtown, Ukraine, Monday, Oct. 24, 2022. With the Russian invasion in its ninth month, many Ukrainians no longer ask if their country will be hit by nuclear weapons. They are actively preparing for that once-unthinkable possibility. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
            
              Dmytro Bondarenko poses for a photo in his apartment in Kyiv, Ukraine, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022. Dmytro Bondarenko is ready for the worst. He's filled the storage area under his fold-up bed and just about every other nook of his apartment in eastern Kyiv with water and nonperishable food. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)
            
              Dmytro Bondarenko poses for a photo in his apartment in Kyiv, Ukraine, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022. Dmytro Bondarenko is ready for the worst. He's filled the storage area under his fold-up bed and just about every other nook of his apartment in eastern Kyiv with water and nonperishable food. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)
            
              Liubov sits on a makeshift bed inside a bomb shelter, where she has been sleeping for more than 8 months along with other ten permanent residents, on the ground floor of her building in Mykolaiv downtown, Ukraine, Monday, Oct. 24, 2022. With the Russian invasion in its ninth month, many Ukrainians no longer ask if their country will be hit by nuclear weapons. They are actively preparing for that once-unthinkable possibility. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
            
              Mykyta, Tetiana, Anzhela and Liubov, from left to the right, stand inside a bomb shelter, where they has been living for more than 8 months along with other ten permanent residents, on the ground floor of her building in Mykolaiv downtown, Ukraine, Monday, Oct. 24, 2022. With the Russian invasion in its ninth month, many Ukrainians no longer ask if their country will be hit by nuclear weapons. They are actively preparing for that once-unthinkable possibility. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
            
              Valentyna looks at her mobile siting on a makeshift bed inside a bomb shelter, where she has been sleeping for more than 8 months along with other ten permanent residents, on the ground floor of her building in Mykolaiv downtown, Ukraine, Monday, Oct. 24, 2022. With the Russian invasion in its ninth month, many Ukrainians no longer ask if their country will be hit by nuclear weapons. They are actively preparing for that once-unthinkable possibility. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
            
              Women stand on a makeshift bed inside a bomb shelter, where they has been sleeping for more than 8 months along with other ten permanent residents, on the ground floor of her building in Mykolaiv downtown, Ukraine, Monday, Oct. 24, 2022. With the Russian invasion in its ninth month, many Ukrainians no longer ask if their country will be hit by nuclear weapons. They are actively preparing for that once-unthinkable possibility. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
            
              Old filters with date inscriptions dating back to 1956, used to renew the air inside an atomic shelter, are photographed piled up inside an atomic shelter built more than 60 years ago on the ground floor of her building in Mykolaiv dowtown, Ukraine, Monday, Oct. 24, 2022. With the Russian invasion in its ninth month, many Ukrainians no longer ask if their country will be hit by nuclear weapons. They are actively preparing for that once-unthinkable possibility. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
            
              Natalia lies down on a makeshift bed inside a bomb shelter, where she has been sleeping for more than 8 months along with other ten permanent residents, on the ground floor of her building in Mykolaiv downtown, Ukraine, Monday, Oct. 24, 2022. With the Russian invasion in its ninth month, many Ukrainians no longer ask if their country will be hit by nuclear weapons. They are actively preparing for that once-unthinkable possibility. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
            
              A woman sits on a makeshift bed inside a bomb shelter, where she has been sleeping for more than 8 months along with other ten permanent residents, on the ground floor of her building in Mykolaiv downtown, Ukraine, Monday, Oct. 24, 2022.With the Russian invasion in its ninth month, many Ukrainians no longer ask if their country will be hit by nuclear weapons. They are actively preparing for that once-unthinkable possibility. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
            
              Natalia sits on a makeshift bed, on a shelter builded on the ground floor of her building in Mykolaiv downtown, Ukraine, Monday, Oct. 24, 2022. With the Russian invasion in its ninth month, many Ukrainians no longer ask if their country will be hit by nuclear weapons. They are actively preparing for that once-unthinkable possibility. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)
Ukrainians face nuclear threat with grit and dark humor