‘We’re so sorry’: Mariupol plant evacuees feel relief, grief


              FILE - Smoke rises from the Metallurgical Combine Azovstal in Mariupol, in territory under the government of the Donetsk People's Republic, eastern in Mariupol, Ukraine, Thursday, May 5, 2022. The steel plant has a maze of more than 30 bunkers and tunnels spread out over its 11 square kilometers (4 miles), and each bunker was its own world. Evacuees had little or no communication with those elsewhere in the plant. (AP Photo/File)
            
              Serhii Tsybulchenko, Elina Tsybulchenko, Ihor Trotsak and Tetyana Trotsak, from left, who fled from Azovstal steel plant in Mariupol, pose for a family photo in Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine, Wednesday, May 4, 2022. The family was among the first to emerge from the steel plant in a tense, days-long evacuation negotiated by the United Nations and the International Committee of the Red Cross with the governments of Russia, which now controls Mariupol, and Ukraine, which wants the city back. A brief cease-fire allowed more than 100 civilians to flee the plant. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)
            
              Members of the Tsybulchenko family have a meal with others after arriving from the Ukrainian city of Mariupol, at a center for displaced people in Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine, Tuesday, May 3, 2022. The family was among the first to emerge from the steel plant in a tense, days-long evacuation negotiated by the United Nations and the International Committee of the Red Cross with the governments of Russia, which now controls Mariupol, and Ukraine, which wants the city back. A brief cease-fire allowed more than 100 civilians to flee the plant. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka)
            
              Tetyana Trotsak and Ihor Trotsak hold the wedding pillow that cushioned their rings in Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine, Wednesday, May 4, 2022. Evacuees from the steel plant in Mariupol are recovering and considering what to do next. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)
            
              Elina Tsybulchenko holds pieces of an Easter basket they carried with fruit into the shelter of the Azovstal steel plant in Mariupol, in Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine, Wednesday, May 4, 2022. Evacuees from the steel plant in Mariupol are recovering and considering what to do next. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)
            
              Serhii Tsybulchenko, who fled from the Azovstal steel plant in Mariupol, carries his belongs as he arrives to a reception center for displaced people in Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine, Tuesday, May 3, 2022. Evacuees from the steel plant in Mariupol are recovering and considering what to do next. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)
            
              Women hold signs as people who fled from Azovstal steel plant in Mariupol and other towns arrive to a reception center for displaced people in Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine, Tuesday, May 3, 2022. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)
            
              Serhii Tsybulchenko, who fled from Azovstal steel plant in Mariupol, arrives with his family to a reception center for displaced people in Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine, Tuesday, May 3, 2022. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)
            
              FILE - Anna, 29, and her son Ivan, 1, who fled from the Azovstal steel plant in Mariupol, arrive to a reception center for displaced people in Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine, on Tuesday, May 3, 2022. Hundreds of civilians and Ukrainian fighters remain trapped at the plant and Russian forces have pushed their way inside. The seizure of Mariupol is expected to play a central role in Moscow’s celebration on May 9 of Victory Day, historically marking the end of World War II. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka, File)
            
              FILE - This image from an undated video provided by the Azov Special Forces Regiment of the Ukrainian National Guard on Sunday, May 1, 2022, shows people walking over debris at the Azovstal steel plant, in Mariupol, eastern Ukraine. The steel plant has a maze of more than 30 bunkers and tunnels spread out over its 11 square kilometers (4 miles), and each bunker was its own world. Evacuees had little or no communication with those elsewhere in the plant. (Azov Special Forces Regiment of the Ukrainian National Guard via AP, File)
            
              Serhii Tsybulchenko, left, and his son-in-law Ihor Trotsak, right, who fled with their family from the Azovstal steel plant in Mariupol, arrive to a reception center for displaced people in Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine, Tuesday, May 3, 2022. The Tsybulchenko family was among the first to emerge from the steel plant in a tense, days-long evacuation negotiated by the United Nations and the International Committee of the Red Cross with the governments of Russia, which now controls Mariupol, and Ukraine, which wants the city back. A brief cease-fire allowed more than 100 civilians to flee the plant. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)
            
              From left, Serhii Tsybulchenko, Ihor Trotsak, Tetyana Trotsak and Elina Tsybulchenko, who fled from the Azovstal steel plant in Mariupol, Ukraine, arrive by bus to a reception center for displaced people in Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine, Tuesday, May 3, 2022. In the earliest days of Russia’s invasion Elina Tsybulchenko, 54, was shocked by the bombardment of her city. Like many residents with memories of civil defense drills, she knew the steel plant had the only real bunkers in town. When she, her husband Serhii, her daughter and her son-in-law decided to hole up in the one under her office, she assumed they would stay only a few days. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)
‘We’re so sorry’: Mariupol plant evacuees feel relief, grief