Wrongful conviction case judge: Was there ‘rush’ to convict?


              Missouri Assistant Attorney General Tristin Estep questions Erika Barrow during the fourth day of Lamar Johnson's wrongful conviction hearing in St. Louis, Thursday, Dec. 15, 2022. (David Carson/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP, Pool)
            
              Erika Barrow gives testimony during the fourth day of Lamar Johnson's wrongful conviction hearing in St. Louis, Thursday, Dec. 15, 2022. Barrow testified that Johnson was with her several miles away from the site at the time when the murder took place. (David Carson/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP, Pool)
            
              A tear rolls down Lamar Johnson's cheek as he testifies on the stand during the fourth day of his wrongful conviction hearing in St. Louis, Thursday, Dec. 15, 2022. (David Carson/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP, Pool)
            
              Circuit Court Judge David Mason listens to testimony during the third day of Lamar Johnson's wrongful conviction hearing in St. Louis on Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2022. (David Carson/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP, Pool)
            
              Lamar Johnson listens to testimony during the third day of his wrongful conviction hearing in St. Louis on Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2022. (David Carson/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP, Pool)
Wrongful conviction case judge: Was there ‘rush’ to convict?