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Immigrant authorized under Obama detained in Tacoma

(KIRO 7)

A 23-year-old man who came to the United States as a 7-year-old immigrant was detained on Friday by immigration authorities, despite his status under the ‘Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals’, or DACA, program.

Immigration officials said they took Daniel Ramirez Medina into custody “based on his admitted gang affiliation and risk to public safety.”

“Mr. Ramirez — a self-admitted gang member — was encountered at a residence in Des Moines, Washington, during an operation targeting a prior-deported felon,” U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement spokeswoman Rose Richeson said in a statement.

Rep. Pramila Jayapal demanded Ramirez’s immediate release.

She said President Trump “is tearing apart families and striking fear into immigrant communities.” Jayapal called for Trump to have Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly to immediately “right this wrong – instead of putting his stamp of approval on deporting innocent young people who were brought here through no fault of their own, followed all the laws in signing up for DACA, and have not lived in the country they are being sent back to.”

Related: Washington’s travel ban lawsuit against Trump heads back to court

While the immigration spokeswoman calls Ramirez a self-admitted gang member and a risk to public safety, Jayapal said “Daniel belongs in our community and must be released immediately to his family.”

Immigrant attorneys file complaint

Ramirez was arrested Feb. 10 by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and transferred to the Northwest Detention Center to await the outcome of removal proceedings before an immigration judge with the Department of Justice’s Executive Office for Immigration Review, said Richeson, the ICE spokeswoman.

KIRO 7’s Natasha Chen obtained a copy of the complaint, showing that Ramirez, who has authorization to live and work in the U.S. under DACA, has been in custody in Tacoma. Ramirez’s attorneys have filed this complaint against the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly, and the director of the Seattle field office of U.S. immigration and custom enforcement Nathalie Asher.

According to the complaint, Ramirez is the father of a U.S. citizen, who has twice been granted deferred action and an employment authorization card under DACA. The complaint shows a copy of his latest DACA renewal, from May 5, 2016, which shows it is in effect for two years following that date.

The complaint states that Ramirez was twice granted DACA status and therefore determined to pose no threat to national security or public safety.

Immigration official responds

The Immigration and Customs Enforcement spokeswoman said he was a risk as a self-admitted gang member when he was detained.

The complaint filed by his attorneys states: “Nevertheless, Mr. Ramirez was taken into custody by several ICE agents at or around 9 a.m. PST on Friday, February, 10, 2017. Mr. Ramirez was asleep at his father’s home in Seattle, Washington when the agents arrived and arrested Mr. Ramirez’s father. The agents had an arrest warrant for Mr. Ramirez’s father.”

The complaint continues to state that following his arrest, Ramirez’s father granted ICE officers permission to enter his home so he could inform his two sons about his arrest. When ICE agents entered, they questioned Ramirez about his legal status, then took him to a processing center in Seattle.

Ramirez informed the officers of his work permit under DACA. But the document states one of the ICE agents replied, “It doesn’t matter, because you weren’t born in this country.”

Despite the fact that his attorneys said Ramirez had his DACA identification with him the time, he was questioned further, fingerprinted, booked and taken to the Tacoma detention center.

The DACA program, which began in 2012, defers removal action against an individual for a certain period of time, covering certain people who were brought to the U.S. at a young age. In order to apply, individuals had to provide the government with personal information, pay a fee, and submit to a background check.

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